The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Aquarium The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Aquarium
Showing posts with label Aquarium. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Aquarium. Show all posts

Thursday, September 10, 2020

Koi Story: A Beginner’s Guide To Raising Koi Fish


Congratulations! You're made the most excellent decision to start raising koi fish of your own. Although it can be a little daunting at first to take on a new pet, you'll soon discover how easy it is to raise these hearty fish. Koi Story has put together this little guide to jump-start your knowledge on your fish pond/habitat, koi care and other general koi  knowledge.

RAISING KOI FISH IN A POND
Koi are a hearty member of the carp fish family and can handle quite a bit if the conditions of your koi carp pond are right. Seasonal ponds should be at least a 1.5 deep (half a meter) while year-long ponds should be at least 4.5 feet (1.5 meters). Water should be kept between 60 and 75 degrees F (about 15-25 degrees C)

Beyond depth and temperature, your koi/carp/fish need a few important things in a pond habitat:

To read more on this story, click here: Koi Story: A Beginner’s Guide To Raising Koi Fish 


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Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Common Freshwater Tropical Fish Diseases


Learn about common fish illnesses and how to effectively treat them.

Looking into your aquarium and seeing one of your fish ill for the first time can be alarming for many hobbyists. Unlike cats and dogs, you can’t just hop in the car and take them to the vet. Moreover, because of the delicate nature of tropical fish, if not treated quickly, the illness may not only kill the infected fish, it could spread to the rest of the tank potentially harming your entire population.

So the obvious question for fish owners when their fish is infected is, “What illness does my fish have and how can I treat it?” The good news is that many of the most common aquarium fish diseases are treatable and if done properly, your fish has a good chance of survival. Moreover, many of the treatments are relatively simple to perform (and a lot cheaper than taking a cat or a dog to the vet).

To read more on this story, click here:  Common Freshwater Tropical Fish Diseases


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Tuesday, August 25, 2020

Same-Sex Penguin Couple Welcomes Baby Chick After Adopting And Hatching An Egg Together


A pair of female penguins at an aquarium in Spain have welcomed a baby chick, the Oceanogràfic València aquarium announced this month. The two penguins, Electra and Viola, adopted an egg from another penguin couple, incubated and hatched it, and will now raise the chick, the aquarium said in a press release.

Of the 25 Gentoo penguins at the aquarium, three couples have welcomed babies so far this breeding season, Oceanogràfic València said.

To read more on this story, click here: Same-Sex Penguin Couple Welcomes Baby Chick After Adopting And Hatching An Egg Together



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Sunday, August 16, 2020

This Aquarium Has Been Closed For Almost Five Months - Now, It's Using Old Wishing Coins To Help Care For Its Animals


For one aquarium, the coins tossed into its waterfall as wishes have become something more than submerged hopes and dreams. The North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores said it's transforming the forgotten change into cold, hard cash.

The public aquarium said in a Facebook post Saturday that its staff turned off its 30-foot-tall "Smoky Mountain" waterfall and rounded up all of the change visitors had tossed in.

To read more on this story, click here: This Aquarium Has Been Closed For Almost Five Months - Now, It's Using Old Wishing Coins To Help Care For Its Animals



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Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Goldfish Survive 4 Months After New Zealand Earthquake


Two goldfish were found alive in their tank in a building that was badly damaged by the earthquake that struck New Zealand.

The two goldfish, named Shaggy and Daphne, have become the smallest survivors of the earthquake in February.  The earthquake killed 181 people in Christchurch.

There were originally six goldfish in the tank when the quake struck. When the survivors were found, there was no trace of three others. A fourth was found dead. There is the question of their missing companions. Goldfish are omnivores.

The fish spent four and a half months, trapped in their tank in a downtown area of the city, that was off-limits. There was no food, or electricity to power their tank filter. They were discovered by workers, and rescued.

The fish survived from eating algae growing on the tank’s rocks and walls. Fish can go without food for a while because they are cold blooded, and unlike mammals don't burn up food to keep warm.



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Saturday, November 10, 2018

How to Care for Oranda Goldfish


If you are both aquarium enthusiasts, you may want to consider oranda goldfish as your first pets together. These beautiful fish develop large hoods called wens on their heads and are as friendly as they are attractive. Understanding proper care for these delicate fish is vital for their longevity.

Educate yourself on the specific needs of oranda goldfish. Common goldfish such as the shubunken have flat, long bodies; but orandas have large, round bodies that make them slow swimmers -- they do not compete well for food with more active species. Their hooded heads are also prone to disease from bacteria and unclean water, so they are not tolerant to polluted water. In addition, unlike other types of goldfish, orandas must have stable water temperatures: not too cold, because they do not thrive if the temperatures in their tanks dips too low.

Choose a tank suitable for your fancy goldfish. Orandas do best in tanks that provide plenty of room to swim. In addition, these hardy fish may reach sizes of 10 to 12 inches (25cm to 30cm) in length, making a spacious home necessary. A long or rectangular tank with capacity of at least 20 to 30 gallons (76l to 114l) will give your pets the space they need to thrive.

Set up your fancy aquatic pets' tank with a filter and heater. Because orandas do not do well in dirty water, a filtration system will help keep their watery environment fresh and clean. An aquarium heater is a must for these fancy fish that are prone to temperature shock if their water temperatures dip too low.

To read more on this story, click here: How to Care for Oranda Goldfish

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Wednesday, November 7, 2018

How To Keep Your Tank Safe During A Power Outage


A power outage may only be a minor inconvenience for you but, for your aquarium fish, it can be deadly.

A power outage is a minor convenience for most people – it simply means that you have to take a break from television, computer, and charging your cell phone. As long as the outage doesn’t last too long there will likely be no damage done. When it comes to your aquarium, however, a power outage can be a major problem. In order to maintain the delicate balance in your tank you need to keep your filtration system and heater running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Whether the outage lasts for a few hours or a few days, there are several things you can do to minimize the damage.

Types of Power Outages

Before getting into the details of how to protect your aquarium during a power outage, it is important that you understand that different types of outages will affect your aquarium in different ways. A localized power outage occurs when the main source of power to the aquarium is disrupted. This could be due to a power strip coming unplugged or a fuse being blown. In some cases the problem is easily remedied – you can just plug the cord back in or flip the switch on the circuit breaker. If the problem is due to an equipment malfunction, like a cracked heater, you may not even realize the problem right away. You may want to consider installing a plug-in alarm that will alert you if the power to your tank is interrupted – this is an especially good investment if you have a very large tank full of expensive fish. It is also a good idea that you use different plugs for different pieces of equipment so they do not all go out at once in the event of a localized power outage.

To read more on this story, click here: How To Keep Your Tank Safe During A Power Outage


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Sunday, November 4, 2018

Have You Ever Owned a Betta Fish? They Are Truly Beautiful Fish!


Have you ever owned a betta fish? If you have then you know the beauty of this little fish! If you have not…Then you don’t know what you are missing!

Several years ago my husband came home from work and surprised me with a beautiful burgundy fish in a vase with a peace lily flower in it. After staring at it for several seconds, I asked where he had gotten it. He told me that a lady on his job was selling them and that he had previously ordered it for me.  She told him that I should keep it in the vase and that it would eat off of the roots.

I ended up getting my betta fish, who we named, fishy-fish, a one gallon aquarium and fed him flakes. He was so cute. He would come close to the glass when he saw us, and would wave his fins. He lived to be 2 years old.

Facts about betta fish:
  • They originate in the shallow waters in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, and parts of China.
  • The water for keeping healthy bettas should be soft, warm, with a neutral to slightly acidic pH.
  • They thrive on heat, and will become increasingly listless when the water temperature falls below 75 degrees.
  • They are one of the most colorful and amusing breed of pet fish to have.
  • Betta fish can live for up to 5 years.
  • 90% of problems with bettas start from stress
  • Poor tank conditions make them sick live foods are best for the betta, however, they will adapt to eating flake foods, frozen and freeze dried foods.
  • Their digestive tract is built to digest meat, rather than vegetable material.
  • Their upturned mouth is designed to grab insects that have fallen into the water.
  • Water movement should be kept to a minimum, which means that power filters and powerheads are not suitable.
  • Only one male may be kept in each aquarium, unless they are separated by a barrier, they will fight.
  • They may be kept in a community tank as long as the water conditions are met, and there are no aggressive fish.
When it comes to owning a pet, most people prefer to start small. Some like to start with hamsters, fish in aquariums. Some people think that the smaller in the pet, the less work!





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Monday, October 29, 2018

'Gay' Penguins Manage to Successfully Hatch Baby Chick and Are Taking Turns to Look After It


At the Sea Life Sydney Aquarium in Australia, caretakers noticed that two male gentoo penguins, Sphen and Magic, had become inseparable. During breeding season, the pair were constantly seen swimming together and waddling around together. Then they began presenting each other with pebbles, a clear sign of romantic interest. (For penguins, pebbles are like diamonds, demonstrating they wish to become a couple.)

The aquarium quickly noticed Sphen and Magic had formed a serious bond. "They recognized each other’s signature calls and songs," said Penguin Department Supervisor Tish Hannan. "Only bonded penguins will be able to successfully find their partner using their calls when they are separated." When the couple constructed a nest out of stones, caretakers provided them with a dummy egg to practice incubating.

To read more on this story, click here: 'Gay' Penguins Manage to Successfully Hatch Baby Chick and Are Taking Turns to Look After It

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Monday, October 22, 2018

How to Raise Koi


Those colorful fish you frequently see in large ponds in Japanese restaurants or shopping areas are becoming increasingly popular as the centerpiece of a backyard garden. The brightly-colored fish are called Koi, and they are the result of selective breeding of German and Asian carp. If you are considering installing a Koi pond, you should first study how to raise Koi.

1 - Select a proper pond. You can purchase a Koi pond made of several different materials from pet stores or Koi specialty retailers. A good rule of thumb is that the Koi pond measurements should be at least 3 feet (0.914 m) deep and contain 300 gallons (1136 liters) per fish. You may want to get a larger pond than you need right away, so that you can add additional fish later.

To read more on this story, click here: How to Raise Koi

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Thursday, October 18, 2018

Tropical Fish Diseases


A home aquarium can host a large variety of bacterial, fungal & parasitic infections. Early treatment is best but there are few things you can do to increase the chance everyone will heal quickly.

Most illnesses are contagious so medicating the entire tank is suggested. Even if the disease is not contagious, it’s not going to harm a healthy fish to give him a dose of treatment too.

If you have a large aquarium it’s advised to set up a hospital tank. Use a smaller 5 gallon aquarium with air pump to place infected fish. Treating a 5 gallon tank is much easier and cheaper then treating a 90 gallon, hence the popularity of hospital tanks for advanced hobbyists and fish breeders.

Always remove carbon for the duration of treatment. In a power filter, you will need to remove the entire cartridge (carbon is located inside). Carbon absorbs medication from the water rending the treatment ineffective.

Adding freshwater aquarium salt helps with healing. A general tonic with electrolytes promoting good health, salt also can counteract the harsh effect of medication by reducing stress. Dissolve some in a cup of water before adding to the aquarium. Follow directions on the box for the proper amount to add according to tank size.

 Most diseases are caused by stress & poor water quality. After the disease outbreak is cleared, you may want to increase the frequency of water changes and perhaps consider using a stronger filter or adding a second filter. Excellent filtration can help prevent disease by keeping water chemistry prime for living conditions.

To read more on this story, click here: Tropical Fish Diseases 

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Monday, September 24, 2018

New Aquarium Opens in Scranton


SCRANTON, Pa. -- There was a lot of pointing, poking and splashing going on as folks ventured through the Electric City Aquarium and Reptile Den in Scranton.

"This is very exciting and it's a beautiful aquarium," said Calli Patitsas of Drums.

Aquarium staff says the new attraction at the Marketplace at Steamtown is almost complete and now open to the public.

This soft opening allows for employees to get their feet wet.

After one day, they are thrilled to see such excitement from visitors, hoping it will inspire a passion for marine life.

"A young child that could be a future marine biologist, a future conservationist, somebody that gets a good experience growing up with these animals they normally don't see. So that's a huge reward for us," said Gary Walker, director at the aquarium.

To read more on this story, click here: New Aquarium Opens in Scranton

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Friday, September 21, 2018

Scientists Give Ecstasy To Octopuses And Are Astounded By What Happened Next


A couple of scientists have taken MDMA out of the clubs and into the aquarium by giving ecstasy to octopuses.

Gül Dölen, a neuroscientist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, has been studying the effects of MDMA for “a long time,” she told NPR.

In the process, she says she and her colleagues “have worked out a lot of neural mechanisms that enable MDMA to have these really, really profound pro-social effects.”

Humans and octopuses both have a gene for a protein that binds serotonin to brain cells. Since MDMA also targets this protein, Dölen wanted to see how the drug would affect the octopus, a notoriously shy, solitary animal.

She wasn’t sure how it would go since octopus brains are built completely different from humans.

“It’s organized much more like a snail’s brain than ours,” Dölen told The Atlantic. She wondered, then, if that would mean the octopus would respond unpredictably to being dosed with Molly.

To read more on this story, click here: Scientists Give Ecstasy To Octopuses And Are Astounded By What Happened Next


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Sunday, August 19, 2018

Have You Seen the Remote Control Fish And Shark? These Are Toys, But They Are For Ages 6 - 99! Everyone Will Love Them


The William Mark Corp. booth, known for a wide variety of toys that can be launched, flown or thrown, was turning heads at New York Toy Fair. They demoed their new Air Swimmers in the middle of the expo hall. If you weren’t paying attention, you may have thought you’d stepped into an aquarium.

They actually float through the air with a very fish-like motion that you just have to see to believe.

The technology behind them is fairly simple. Each Air Swimmer is a refillable helium balloon that receives commands from an infrared remote. The user’s input via this remote controls both a tail motor and an adjustable weight. The tail fin motor can vary its flapping rate and range of motion to control both speed and left-right direction, while the adjustable weight uses a motor to slide along the length of the Air Swimmer’s underside, thereby controlling tilt. Using the relatively low-tech infrared remote that requires a line-of-sight connection allows the Air Swimmers to retail for about $39.99. All you need to do is provide a helium fill-up and fresh AAA batteries prior to use.

Warning: If you show these videos to your kids…they will be on their Christmas list!




 





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Friday, August 10, 2018

Axolotls Make Interesting Pets


The axolotl is a type of aquatic salamander that looks somewhat like a cross between a fish and a lizard! While axolotl are definitely unusual and have a very distinctive appearance- being somewhat like a standard looking lizard, but with gills and an underwater habitat- they are actually relatively easy to keep as pets, with a little research and understanding of their nature and what is involved. Intrigued? Read on to find out more!

Why do axolotl make interesting pets?
As well as being very distinctive looking (most of your visitors will never have heard of axolotl at all, unless they happen to be reptile enthusiasts)! Axolotl have a range of other uniquely interesting characteristics that are appealing to many pet lovers. They have superior regenerative qualities, even in comparison to other lizards, such as those that can regenerate their tails and scales. Axolotl heal very easily if injured, and can re-grow limbs such as a leg if hurt or attacked by other animals. While they are not hugely energetic and active all of the time, they are not generally prone to hiding or lying still for long periods of time, and so are eminently watchable and fascinating to observe.

All about axolotl
Axolotls are neotenic, which means that they don’t generally undergo the distinct metamorphosis from larvae to adult that usually occurs with other types of salamanders. They become sexually mature (and so reach adulthood) and reproduce within the water, instead of maturing and moving onto land. To further add to the confusion, axolotl do sometimes metamorphose into terrestrial animals, although almost without exception this only happens in the wild, and very rarely. Axolotl are native to Mexico, where many different sub-species of the genus exist. The type of axolotl that is commonly available to buy as pets within the UK are of the Ambystoma Mexicana genus. Correctly cared for, they are hardy animals that can live for well over ten years under suitable conditions. Axolotl should not be handled if at all avoidable, as their skin and gills are very soft and malleable and can easily become damaged. Young axolotl can become cannibalistic to others, and so should not be housed together while young. Sometimes adult tank mates can also be aggressive, especially if the tank is overcrowded, so this should be carefully managed. Axolotl will eat other fish and organisms in the water, so they should not be kept with other aquatic pets! Axolotl can grow quite large when mature- around 25 cm is not uncommon, although even larger domestic axolotl are by no means unusual either!


What do I need to care for axolotl?
The basic kit required to care for axolotl is not too dissimilar to that required for fish, with a few minor changes. You will need a sturdy glass or acrylic tank of at least 45 litres capacity to keep a couple of axolotl happily, as well as a suitable secure lid for the tank as axolotl are no strangers to climbing.  You should keep the water temperature between 16 to 18 degrees celsius ( around 60 to 64 degrees fahrenheit), higher temperatures can lead to stress and possible death.  It is also important that your axolotl are not subjected to the glare of bright light. While a tank light can be incorporated within the lid so that you can watch what your axolotl are doing, ensure that it is not too bright or intense, and that it is turned off for sufficient periods of time during the hours of darkness. You will also need to provide a substrate for the base of the tank. It is usually advised that you should use sand as the substrate, or alternatively, don't use any substrate at all.  Ensure that you don’t use gravel or small stones, as axolotl may ingest these inadvertently which could get caught in their digestive tracts. Some hiding places such as ornaments and plants are also recommended. Finally, as with all aquatic creatures, water quality and filtration are incredibly important. A water filter should be incorporated into your axolotl’s tank, and the tank should be cleaned out regularly with partial water changes performed as needed. If you use tap water in the tank, this should be treated first with appropriate supplements for the water quality in your area, much as is the case when keeping fish.

What do axolotl eat?
In the wild, axolotl eat a wide range of foodstuffs such as fish, crustaceans, worms and other reptiles. When kept in a tank, it’s important to note that regular fish food is not a suitable substitute for their natural diet, and you will have to pay a little more attention to your axolotl’s feeding routine than you would if keeping fish. Brine shrimp, tubifex worm, bloodworm and other suitable meals can all be bought easily from most pet stores in frozen packages, which can be stored at home and administered as appropriate. Axolotl can also eat pre-packaged dried fish food pellets such as those fed to farmed salmon and other carnivorous fish. Axolotl should be fed at least once a day, with any uneaten food cleared out of the tank promptly. Keeping your axolotl well fed is important, as hungry axolotl are exponentially more likely to see each other as a snack!

Where can you buy axolotl?
Axolotl are often available in larger pet shops that stock reptiles and fish, and from specialist retailers and breeders such as you can find online. Axolotl are relatively hardy and low maintenance animals to keep, but as with any potential pet, it is vital to research them thoroughly before considering a purchase, and ensure that you have both the time and financial resources available to be able to care for them for the duration of their lives.






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Sunday, July 8, 2018

Did You Know That Goldfish Were One of the First Fish Species to Be Kept in Ponds by Humans


Did you know that the goldfish are one of the most common type of pets in the world? They were one of the first fish species to be kept in ponds by humans. By nature, goldfish are social creatures and prefer to live with other goldfish.


Many people think that goldfish are pets for someone who doesn't have much time for pet care. The lifespan of your goldfish depend upon how much care you provide goldfish.  If cared for properly your goldfish could live for many years!

Goldfish start off small, but grow to be quite large, sometimes even a foot long, if you take good care of them. First time goldfish keepers usually buy a small tank or bowl to house their goldfish, only to discover that they need to keep buying ever-larger replacement tanks. You should buy a large enough tank at the beginning. You should provide a 20 to 30 gallon tank for your fish. Then add at least 10 gallons to that volume for each additional goldfish you might add. They grow large, excrete a lot of waste and need room to swim in order to be happy!

Food:    Goldfish like a diet of flakes, pellets, wafers and sticks

Goldfish Facts:

Do goldfish have ears? They have internal ear bones called an otolith that can feel vibrations. Avoid tapping on the glass since it will stress or even kill them.

A goldfish can survive in an outdoor pond where water temperatures dip down below 40*F (5*C). Some ponds might even freeze over during the winter and the goldfish still survive through to the spring.



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Monday, November 13, 2017

Goldfish - One Of The Most Common Type Of Pets In The World


Did you know that the goldfish are one of the  most common type of pets in the world? They were one of the first fish species to be kept in ponds by humans. By nature, goldfish are social creatures and prefer to live with other goldfish.

Many people think that goldfish are pets for someone who doesn't have much time for pet care. The lifespan of your goldfish depend upon how much care you provide goldfish.  If  cared for properly your goldfish could live for many years!


Goldfish start off small, but grow to be quite large, sometimes even a foot long, if you take good care of them. First time goldfish keepers usually buy a small tank or bowl to house their goldfish, only to discover that they need to keep buying ever-larger replacement tanks. You should buy a large enough tank at the beginning. You should provide a 20 to 30 gallon tank for your fish. Then add at least 10 gallons to that volume for each additional goldfish you might add. They grow large, excrete a lot of waste and need room to swim in order to be happy!


Food:    Goldfish like a diet of flakes, pellets, wafers and sticks


Goldfish Facts:

Do goldfish have ears? They have internal ear bones called an otolith that can feel vibrations. Avoid tapping on the glass since it will stress or even kill them.

A goldfish can survive in an outdoor pond where water temperatures dip down below 40*F (5*C). Some ponds might even freeze over during the winter and the goldfish still survive through to the spring.


      Exterior Parts of A Goldfish







                         

Goldfish Synchronized Swimming



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Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Coast Guard Rescues an 800 Pound Pregnant Manatee: She Will Be Temporarily Housed at SeaWorld


A complex rescue effort involving a Coast Guard plane is helping return a pregnant manatee to the wild. The 800-pound marine mammal was rescued in September off the coast of Massachusetts.

Less than a month later, veterinarians gave the go-ahead to make the journey from a base in Groton, Connecticut back to Florida, where the manatee is beginning the next phase of her recovery, reports CBS News correspondent David Begnaud. 

The manatee – named Washburn for the island where she was rescued – returned to the Sunshine State after a 1,300-mile flight aboard a Coast Guard transport plane.

Escorted by police, a slow procession moved through the streets of Orlando to her temporary new home at SeaWorld.

There, a crane hoisted Washburn into a private rehab tank. You could almost see the relief as she hit the water.

The once anonymous manatee became a summer celebrity. She was spotted bobbing in the choppy waters off Cape Cod in late August. Conservationists with the International Fund for Animal Welfare sprang into action, capturing Washburn three weeks later, and taking her to the Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut. 

When Washburn arrived there, it became clear that this rescue operation was even more important than first thought. Veterinarians discovered this manatee was a mom-to-be.

“It’s not only one manatee but it’s two so the stakes are pretty high,” said Dr. Jen Flower, a veterinarian at Mystic Aquarium.

Manatees, also known as “sea cows,” can weigh over 3,000 pounds, eating a diet comprised mainly of sea grass. The animals, native to Florida, spent nearly 50 years on the endangered species list, but the population is recovering. 

Sea World veterinarian Lara Croft accompanied Washburn on the flight south. She said just saving one has proven to be worth the extraordinary effort.

“We did have one orphan calf that was hand-reared, returned to the wild and she gave birth to nine calves,” Croft said. “And who knows how many calves that those calves had. One manatee can have a huge effect on the population.”

Now that Washburn is back home in Florida, the staff at SeaWorld is working hard to prepare her return to the wild, where she’s expected to give birth in about four to six months. SeaWorld has released 17 manatees back into the wild thus far.


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Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Inky the Octopus Slipped Through a Gap at the Top of His Enclosure: Escapes Down Pipe to Ocean


By the time the staff at New Zealand’s National Aquarium noticed that he was missing, telltale suction cup prints were the main clue to an easily-solved mystery.

Inky had said see ya to his tank-mate, slipped through a gap left by maintenance workers at the top of his enclosure and, as evidenced by the tracks, made his way across the floor to a six-inch-wide drain. He squeezed his football-sized body in — octopuses are very malleable, aquarium manager Rob Yarrall told the New Zealand website Stuff — and made a break for the Pacific.

“He managed to make his way to one of the drain holes that go back to the ocean. And off he went,” Yarrall told Radio New Zealand. “And he didn’t even leave us a message.”

The cephalopod version of “Shawshank Redemption” took place three months ago, but it only became public Tuesday. Inky, who already had some local renown in the coastal city of Napier, quickly became a global celebrity cheered on by strangers.

Inky had resided at the aquarium since 2014, when he was taken in after being caught in a crayfish pot, his body scarred and his arms injured. The octopus’s name was chosen from nominations submitted to a contest run by the Napier City Council.

Kerry Hewitt, the aquarium’s curator of exhibits, said at the time that Inky was “getting used to being at the aquarium” but added that staff would “have to keep Inky amused or he will get bored.”

Guess that happened.

This isn’t the first time a captive octopus decided to take matters into its own hands — er, tentacles. In 2009, after a two-spotted octopus at the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium in California took apart a water recycling valve, directed a tube to shoot water out of the tank for 10 hours and caused a massive flood, Scientific American asked octopus expert Jennifer Mather about the animals’ intelligence and previous such hijinks at aquariums.

“They are very strong, and it is practically impossible to keep an octopus in a tank unless you are very lucky. … Octopuses simply take things apart,” Mather said. “I recall reading about someone who had built a robot submarine to putter around in a large aquarium tank. The octopus got a hold of it and took it apart piece by piece. There’s a famous story from the Brighton Aquarium in England 100 years ago that an octopus there got out of its tank at night when no one was watching, went to the tank next door and ate one of the lumpfish and went back to his own tank and was sitting there the next morning.”

Yarrall said the aquarium has no plans to replace Inky, but it does intend to better secure the tank where now just one octopus remains.

“They are always exploring and they are great escape artists,” Yarrall said, according to Hawke’s Bay Today. “We’ll be watching the other one.”


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Monday, March 7, 2016

Rare Video at Monterey Bay Aquarium: A Pregnant Wild Sea Otter Giving Birth on a Rock in the Waters Surrounding the Facility


Visitors to Monterey Bay Aquarium in central California were treated to a rare and unexpected sight over the weekend: a pregnant wild sea otter giving birth on a rock in the waters surrounding the facility.

The sea otter took shelter in the aquarium’s Great Tide Pool on Saturday. Video showed her writhing atop a rock as she labored.

“It’s not every day you get to watch a sea otter pup come into the world!” the aquarium wrote on a Facebook post. “Our sea otter researchers have been watching wild otters for years and have never seen a birth close up like this. We’re amazed and awed to have had a chance to witness this Monterey Bay conservation success story first hand in our own backyard.”

In video of the birth, the mama sea otter could be seen grooming the baby immediately after it was born. Such meticulous grooming, the aquarium explained, will keep the baby warm and buoyant.

Get a closer look at the sea otter birth in the YouTube video below. (As the aquarium warned, “Spoiler alert: the miracle of life is graphic!”)




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