The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Kitten The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Kitten
Showing posts with label Kitten. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kitten. Show all posts

Sunday, January 15, 2023

Hair Loss on Hind Legs in Cats


A cat losing hair on its hind legs is cause for concern. It's normal for a cat to be shedding, but sudden loss or thinning of hair on the back legs is not. Hair loss in cats, also known as alopecia, can be caused by a variety of issues from fleas, allergies, a bacterial infection, or stress, all of which are problems that must be addressed. Know the difference between normal shedding and abnormal hair loss so you can react appropriately.

To read more on this story, click here: Hair Loss on Hind Legs in Cats


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Saturday, June 25, 2022

‘A SENSE OF RELIEF’: Meals on Wheels offers pet care assistance to clients


HANCOCK COUNTY — Peggy McConnell was moved to tears when she opened her Meals on Wheels delivery a couple months ago.

It wasn’t the sight of the food that made her emotional, but the flyer attached on top, announcing that Meals on Wheels of Hancock County would start offering financial assistance for pet food, veterinary care and pet boarding.

To read more on this story, click here: ‘A SENSE OF RELIEF’: Meals on Wheels offers pet care assistance to clients


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Can cats have twins? We asked a vet!


Unneutered cats are prolific breeders when left to their own devices, with females often becoming pregnant from multiple fathers. One of our readers asked us whether kittens from the same litter can be twins, and we asked Dr. Hannah Godfrey for an answer. So, can cats have twins?

Twins in cats

Wikipedia defines twins as two animals born during the same pregnancy. If we go by their definition, all kittens born in the same litter are technically twins, so cats can indeed have twins. But this is not the end of the story ..

To read more on this story, click here: Can cats have twins? We asked a vet!


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Tuesday, May 10, 2022

Animals and COVID-19


What You Need to Know

  •  The risk of animals spreading SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, to people is low.

  •  The virus can spread from people to animals during close contact.
  •  More studies are needed to understand if and how different animals could be affected by COVID-19.
  • People with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 should avoid contact with animals, including pets, livestock, and wildlife.

To read more on this story, click here: Animals and COVID-19


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Friday, April 22, 2022

Gimme Five! Five Animal Bills Pass The Maryland General Assembly in 2022


Five Animal Bills Pass the Maryland General Assembly in 2022

Thanks to YOU, our dedicated team of advocates, organizations, and legislators, 2022 was a HISTORIC year for animals in Maryland! FIVE bills passed that greatly improve the welfare of animals in our state. In a definitive show of support for animal welfare in Maryland and beyond, Governor Hogan has signed all five bills.

Cat Declaw Prohibition (SB67/HB22) Senator Cheryl Kagan/Delegate Lorig Charkoudian Maryland becomes the second state to ban this cruel and painful procedure except in medically necessary circumstances that involve the health of the cat. New York outlawed elective declawing in 2019. Fourteen US cities have banned the practice including Los Angeles, San Francisco, Austin, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh. Elective declawing is illegal in most of Europe as well as in Brazil, Israel, Australia, and New Zealand.

To read more on this story, click here: Gimme Five! Five Animal Bills Pass The Maryland General Assembly in 2022


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Wednesday, April 20, 2022

Adults Cringed At Kitty Too “Terrifying” To Look At So Little Girl Stepped Up


A tiny kitten was abandoned on the cruel streets of Istanbul. She eked out a living in an Istanbul alleyway, where she tried to survive as best as she could. Although other strays were able to benefit from passers-by, this kitten was completely neglected. The reason for this: She looked too awful to look at.

The kitten was born with facial abnormalities and one ear as a result of no fault of her own. She was malnourished and infested with parasites and skin illnesses. But because she was “too ugly” to rescue, no one did anything for her. But then, all at once, an angel appeared.

To read more on this story, click here: Adults Cringed At Kitty Too “Terrifying” To Look At So Little Girl Stepped Up


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Tuesday, April 19, 2022

Understanding Animal Ministers and Chaplains


Twenty years ago the idea of an animal minister or chaplain would have induced a fit of the giggles. These days if you say something about an animal chaplain, you are likely to be asked where a person might find one. Animals have become the cornerstone of many of our lives and these spiritual leaders don’t preach to pets, but rather assist others in finding meaningful way of living with animals.

What is Animal Ministry?

Animal ministry is actually about people and how we interconnect with the animals around us. Most religions have traditions regarding the spirituality of animals and that intersects with human life in a positive way. Some would argue that in American culture, this reverence for feathered, furred and scaled creatures has disappeared. This is where animal ministries step in.

To read more on this story, click here: Understanding Animal Ministers and Chaplains


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Monday, April 18, 2022

Kitten Feeding Schedule: From Newborn to One Year


This chart shows you when, what, and how much to feed your fluffy bundle of joy.

Kittens, like human babies, start out life consuming liquid nourishment and slowly graduate to solid foods. Mother cats take care of a kitten’s nutritional needs through their milk from the day their kittens are born until they are around 4 to 6 weeks old. 

Feeding An Orphaned Kitten

But if you have a kitten without a mother, you need to provide food that’s formulated for kitten health. Whether your orphaned kitten is a newborn or one that's a few weeks old, you should bottle feed them. Bottle-feeding a kitten isn’t difficult, but it does take a little know-how to do it properly. These tips for how to bottle feed a kitten can help. 

To read more on this story, click here: Kitten Feeding Schedule: From Newborn to One Year


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Taiwan Coffee Shop Creates Incredibly Realistic Latte Pup Portraits


Latte art is all the rage in coffee shops around the world, but you’ve never seen anything like the extraordinary portraits-in-foam created by the baristas at My Cofi café in Taiwan.

Many shops have invested in gadgets that allow them to turn your photos into intricate latte images, but the artists at My Cofi don’t need a machine to design their masterpieces. All of their three-dimensional portraits are created entirely by hand!

To read more on this story, click here:  Taiwan Coffee Shop Creates Incredibly Realistic Latte Pup Portraits


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In Vietnam There Is A Dog That Looks Like A Cat, Meet H’mong


“Do you like dogs or cats?” is a common question when you meet someone, and it automatically puts you on one side. Like being left-handed or right-handed.

But you probably didn’t see this coming. It seems that in Vietnam there is a dog that looks like a cat, and it may be the answer to the eternal division between cats and dogs. The people of this subreddit immediately began to share their conspiracy theories about the breed of this animal. Some said that it looked like a cartoon, others explained that it was the H’mong breed, and still others said that they did not care what it was because it was so adorable.

To read more on this story, click here: This Puppy Looks Like A Hybrid Between A Cat And A Dog, And His Expressions Are So Funny


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April is Pet First Aid Awareness Month: Do You Have a Pet First Aid Kit?


April is Pet First Aid Awareness Month. First aid care is not a substitute for veterinary care, but it may save your pet's life until it receives veterinary treatment. Our handy checklist tells you all the supplies to have on hand for pet first aid. 

You can download, print and save the full checklist at  

                                    PET FIRST AID



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Saturday, February 26, 2022

The Joys of Owning a Cat


Owning a cat can bring unconditional love and companionship to your life. Having a feline friend can also help to relieve stress and improve your heart health.

Owning a cat can be an extremely rewarding relationship. A cat has the ability to both calm your nervous system and provide an immediate outlet for fun and play. Although cats are independent animals who like to scavenge and explore on their own terms, they are also very affectionate with their owners and people they trust.

To read more on this story, click here: The Joys of Owning a Cat


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Vomiting and diarrhoea in cats


Cats often vomit or develop diarrhoea, when should we treat? The reason for the vomiting or diarrhoea may be simple, such as a hairball, however the cause could be more serious. Whether the symptoms stop on their own, or whether your cat needs to see a vet, will depend on how he or she is in themselves and what the vomit or diarrhoea looks like.

To read more on this story, click here: Vomiting and diarrhoea in cats


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Caracals as Pets


When it comes to breeds, cat lovers have their pick of the litter with common types like the Persian and Maine Coon. What about more exotic cats? While lions, tigers, and leopards are generally confined to zoos and nature preserves, residents of certain states can keep smaller wildcats as pets.

In Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Indiana, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, and South Dakota, it’s legal for licensed individuals to purchase and own caracals, a distinctive-looking wildcat.

To read more on this story, click here: Caracals as Pets


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Saturday, February 12, 2022

Cat Has Very Own Custom Fish Tank with Inside Viewing Box


Look, we’ve all watched cartoons. So we all know one indisputable fact: you can’t own both fish and cats. Otherwise, at some point your feline friend will dive into the tank and eat all the fish. The cat will then get the bowl stuck on their head. It’s hilarious, yes. But it’s also dangerous, for all of the animals. If you want to keep both pets in your home though, one animal-lover has found the perfect way for them to coexist. Jasper the cat has his very own custom-made aquarium. It features a built-in viewing box that lets him safely get up-close and personal with his aquatic siblings.

To read more on this story, click here: Cat Has Very Own Custom Fish Tank with Inside Viewing Box



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Information about COVID-19, Pets, and Other Animals


A number of animals worldwide have been infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, including pets like cats and dogs, farmed mink, and large cats, gorillas, and otters in zoos, sanctuaries, and aquariums. Reptiles and birds have not been affected by this virus. The risk of animals spreading the virus to people is low, but people with COVID-19 can spread the virus to animals during close contact. The information linked to below provides guidance for pet owners, public health professionals, animal health and wildlife officials, veterinarians, and others on how to prevent the spread of COVID-19 between people and animals.

To read more on this story, click here: Information about COVID-19, Pets, and Other Animals


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Our Pets Can Feel the Daylight Savings Shift More Strongly Than We Do


While pushing the clocks back only one hour might seem like business as usual for us, our pets’ are sometimes not as amenable and might act up!  Just by switching the clocks to Daylight Savings Times, our dogs and cat’s schedules can be completely off-kilter!  Our fur children are so in tune with when they are going to be fed, what time to go to sleep and eat, that we need to be prepared!

Dogs and cats have internal clocks that affect their rhythm

Just like humans, animals have internal clocks that tell them when to eat, sleep and wake up. This biological timekeeper, also known as circadian rhythm, is set in motion by natural sunlight. However, for pets this effect is minimized by the artificial environment they live in, where light comes on not with the rising sun but with the flip of a switch.  Household pets might get grumpy when they show up to an empty food dish at their perceived dinner time.

Our dogs and cats are used to their routine so we need to ease them into the new time

A dog or cat’s daily routine is something they would prefer to be written in stone. Unfortunately, things happen that can alter schedules and a simple time change can be perplexing for some pets. When we gain an hour and can sleep in, our pets are still on daylight savings time and don’t understand why we’re still in bed when they are up and ready to go. Their internal clock is saying morning has arrived and it’s time to get moving (and get fed!).

Our dogs and cats are more affected by daylight savings than we are

Our pets, however, might feel the daylight savings shift more strongly than us. Pay attention to them this week; they might be cranky themselves. Sleepy dogs might not want to end their naps to go out on a walk earlier than expected. Or some cats might turn their noses up at food if that comes an hour before the normal time.  In the wild, animals pattern their lives around the phases of the sun, but domesticated pets follow their own versions of our schedules. Daylight savings can really mess with our pets internal rhythms for a few days, or even a week, until they readjust.

Try to change their schedule in increments and they will adjust quickly

The good news is most pets will adjust to the time change fairly quickly.  A few things you can do to make the transition easier is to keep them on their normal schedule and slowly begin to change their daily routine by 5-10 minutes each day.  Keep doing this until you make up for the hour change adjustment. Moving their feeding times, play time and walks back a little each day can make it easier for dogs and cats to adjust.

Most cats won’t be as affected as dogs will while some pets won’t even notice.  
But, don’t be surprised if your dog or cat wakes you up earlier to be fed and might be a bit cranky this upcoming week!


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Friday, February 11, 2022

Mom Cat Comforting Her Kitten - Take A Look At This Adorable Video


This is an adorable video of a sleeping kitten and its mother. Is the kitten having a bad dream...maybe a nightmare? To find out if feline science backs up that anthropomorphic explanation, we talked to Dr. Nicholas Dodman, director of the animal behavior clinic at Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.

Do you think that this kitten is dreaming or having a nightmare? Do kittens really have nightmares, or dreams at all?

Well, the kitten’s clearly dreaming. It may not be a dream or a nightmare, it may be running after a mouse; we’ll never know.  Some will say: You can’t prove cats dream. But if you measure brainwaves in cats, dogs and several other animals, it’s clear that they go through a period of rapid-eye movement, or REM sleep, when the brain is very active. In humans, exactly the same thing happens and that’s when we dream.

I read a study that kittens do a lot of this kind of sleeping in their early life, as their brain is developing. And I believe it makes sense that REM sleep is not only associated with the maturation of neurons in the brain, but also with dreaming processes. As kittens begin to sense the world around them, those things can be regurgitated in sleep in the form of dreams.

If it’s sleeping so deeply, why is it twitching its paws?

Humans and cats both have certain muscles that are for precision, as well as what are called larger “anti-gravity muscles” like those that lift your legs. Those larger ones are activated by a neurochemical called serotonin. During REM sleep, the brain’s serotonin system is shut off, which means the anti-gravity muscles are shut off. What’s not switched off are these highly-tuned muscles in things like eyes and extremities what for us would be fingers and toes, but for them it’s paws and whiskers.

This kitten is in the state of sleep some people call “the sleep of the body,” because the body is totally relaxed except for these tips of things twitching, while the brain is active and dreaming. The opposite is “sleep of the mind,” when the brainwaves go very big and slow, almost flattening out, but the muscles are not completely relaxed with a cat, that would be a catnap.

And what does the mom’s reaction look like to you? Is she really “hugging” the kitten?

Mommy is doing what mommy cats do. Like humans, they sort of fall in love with their babies. The hormone involved is oxytocin, it’s involved in all sorts of bonding, even between humans and their pets. So she’s cuddling up and keeping her baby close. She seems to be in slow-wave sleep, not REM, and the kitten’s movements seem to disturb her slightly.

One limb happens to be under the kitten, and she puts her other paw across and feels the presence of her baby. To me it’s a perfectly natural example of maternal care and affection to a kitten who’s dreaming. You could refer to it as a hug. They’re mutually bonded and I think they enjoy the presence of each other. Human analogies are not entirely inaccurate.

How old would you guess this kitten is, or how far along in its development?

It looks pretty young, I’d say two to three weeks, though that’s just a guess. There are three main periods of growing up in a kitten. In the first two weeks, they’re basically just like little milk-sucking maggots; they can’t even open their eyes. In weeks two to seven, their eyes and ears open and they learn to socialize. And after that they’re called juveniles, becoming more independent. So we’re looking at a kitten that I think is in that second phase.

The mother still needs to take great care of it because fear, the perception of danger, takes a while to develop. Humans and animals are born literally fearless, and need the parent to watch out for them or they might crawl right off the side of a bed, for example. So a kitten this young can’t stray far from its mother safely, and she keeps it close; draws it in often.




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Did You Know That Cats Are Officially ‘Seniors’ By The Time They Reach 10 Years of Age?


Cats are officially “seniors” by the time they reach 10 years of age. Fortunately, kitties today often live well into their teens and even their early 20s, so a 10-year-old healthy “senior” cat still has lots of living left to do!

At 10 to 12 years, most cats have slowed down a bit and tend to feel more stress in response to changes in their routine or environment. Cats at this age can also begin to develop the same types of health problems older people face, including arthritis, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and kidney disease. That’s why it’s so important to bring your cat for twice-yearly wellness visits with your veterinarian. The sooner a change in your kitty’s health is identified and addressed, the better the long-term outcome.

At 13 to 15 years, many cats experience some loss of vision and hearing, and can also develop age-related cognitive dysfunction. Kitties at this age tend to do a lot more napping and may grow a little crabby and easily annoyed. Frequent checkups in which your vet performs a complete geriatric workup are essential to maintaining your cat’s good health.

One can compare a cat of 16 to an 80-year-old human. A kitty at 16 or older is moving and thinking more slowly than he once did, and he probably has a few age-related health issues. He’s likely not as alert or responsive as he once was. It’s a good idea to keep a journal of any changes you notice in your pet, including his appetite and water consumption, signs of constipation or incontinence, aggressive behavior, or mental confusion. Signs that a cat is in pain can include hiding, panting, shortness of breath, teeth grinding, loss of interest in food, or reluctance to move around.

There are many things owners of senior cats can do to help their pet enjoy a good quality of life in their golden years. These include feeding the right nutrition, providing opportunities for exercise and environmental enrichment, offering supplements that are especially beneficial for older cats, providing multiple easy-in/easy-out litter boxes, and setting aside time each day to have positive interactions with their pet.
By Dr. Becker

By the time your cat reaches the age of 10, she’s officially a feline senior citizen. The good news is that many cats today are living into their late teens and even early 20s. With the proper care, a kitty in good health at 10 can easily live another 8, 10, or even 12 years.

So there’s no need to panic if your purr-y companion is getting older, but it IS time to start taking some steps to insure your pet stays as happy and healthy as possible throughout her senior and geriatric years.

But first, let’s take a look at how cats show signs of aging and what you can expect as your kitty gets older.

What to Expect at 10 to 12 Years
By the time most kitties turn 10, they have slowed down a little (or a lot, depending on how high-energy they were as youngsters). You might notice your cat isn’t jumping up on high surfaces as much anymore, or isn’t climbing to the uppermost spot on the cat tree.

And while all cats, regardless of age, do best with a consistent daily routine, older cats can become especially stressed when presented with anything new or different in their environment.

You might also notice your kitty doesn’t always run right out to greet you when you get home. He may not initiate play as often as he once did, and he may take more naps.  

Many cats also become more vocal as they age, and more fearful of strange or loud noises and unfamiliar people.

Older cats can also suffer from many of the same health challenges older humans face, including arthritis, diabetes, thyroid problems, and kidney disease, so it’s really important to bring your cat for twice-yearly wellness visits with your veterinarian. The sooner a change in your kitty’s health is identified and addressed, the easier it will be to resolve or manage the problem.

At veterinary visits, be sure to mention any and all behavior changes you’ve noticed in your cat, no matter how minor, as these can provide important clues about health problems that may be brewing under the surface. It’s also important you and your vet keep regular tabs on your cat’s weight, to assure she isn’t gaining or shrinking over time.

What to Expect at 13 to 15 Years
From 13 to 15 years of age, not only are most cats moving quite a bit slower than they once did, many are also experiencing at least some loss of vision and hearing. They may also have less tolerance for cold temperatures.

Elderly cats can develop age-related dementia, making small changes in their environment or routine increasingly stressful. Some older kitties are also easily confused.

Along with more napping and less activity, your senior cat may grow a bit cranky and easily irritated. If your household includes young children or a rambunctious dog, everyone will need to learn to approach kitty in a quiet, non-aggressive manner. And if yours is a multi-pet household, it’s important not to allow your aging cat to be bullied by younger pets who may sense a change in the natural pecking order.

You may also notice that your cat prefers to spend more time alone these days. You can enhance his feelings of safety and security by making his favorite hideout a warm, comfy little spot he can retreat to whenever he likes. But keep in mind that senior cats still need to interact with their humans regularly, so set aside some time each day to spend with your pet. You can engage him in gentle play, an ear scratching session, or some brushing or combing.

As I mentioned earlier, your cat is now at the age where twice-yearly veterinary checkups are essential in order to safeguard his health. Your vet will perform a geriatric workup, including a physical exam and blood, urine, and stool sample tests. The results of these tests will provide a snapshot of how well your cat’s organs are functioning, and point to any potential problems.

Your vet will also check the condition of your kitty’s coat and skin, his footpads and nails, and his teeth and gums.


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Saving Your Pet with CPR



With pets increasingly being treated like a member of the family, many owners are leaning emergency techniques like CPR to keep their pet alive before bringing it to a veterinarian. Please take a look at the flyer below:



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