The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Fish Tank The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Fish Tank
Showing posts with label Fish Tank. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fish Tank. Show all posts

Saturday, September 4, 2021

Beginner’s Guide to Set Up a Freshwater Aquarium


For many, fishkeeping looks like an easy enough hobby, but hear me out when I tell you that there’s more to it than meets the eyes.

If you’re serious about setting up an aquarium, you’ll find that there are many things to consider like fish compatibility, tank size, water chemistry, and tank maintenance.

In this guide to freshwater aquariums, I’ll walk you through the steps to set up your first freshwater tank.

By the end of my beginner-friendly guide, you’ll know:

To read more on this story, click here: Beginner’s Guide to Set Up a Freshwater Aquariu


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Saltwater Aquarium – Setup and Tips for Beginners


Here at Reef Tank Resource, we would be remiss if we didn’t provide information about starting a new saltwater aquarium setup with marine fish only and live rock – no corals. Heresy you say? That’s no reef tank!

Not so fast buckaroo. Live rock is typically made up of coral, just not live coral. Semantics? Fair enough. But reef tanks typically start out as FOWLR (Fish Only With Live Rock) tanks prior to adding live corals. Also, a FOWLR saltwater aquarium is a great place to start as a beginner.

Additionally, it’s great for advanced reefers too. What’s nice about a FOWLR is you can keep saltwater fish in your aquarium that normally wouldn’t work with a reef tank. The rockscape can be quite attractive in and of itself.

To read more on this story, click here: Saltwater Aquarium – Setup and Tips for Beginners



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Tuesday, August 17, 2021

Care Guide for Discus Fish – The King of the Aquarium


Discus fish are one of the most beautiful freshwater fish in the hobby, known for their spectacular colors and large, circular shape. However, they’re notorious for being extremely difficult to keep, with Internet forums often recommending strict practices like 100% water changes every day. In reality, only a small percentage of people are able to follow those rules, and the rest of the world uses more low maintenance methods. We’ve spent many years keeping discus personally at home, caring for them in our fish store, and helping customers be successful with them. Based on our experiences, this care guide offers practical advice and useful tips for beginners starting their first discus tank.

To read more on this story, click here: Care Guide for Discus Fish – The King of the Aquarium


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Friday, August 13, 2021

Top 5 Benefits You'll Get From Owning Pet Koi


The Good and Bad of Keeping Koi

Any type of pet comes with their own challenges and setbacks, and koi fish are no different. They're subject to disease, emergencies and sometimes sadly turn out to be a bad fit for their owner. For the sake of those who have the time, finances and space to keep these great creatures, let's embrace the positive gems that koi have to offer.

1. The Best Parts of This Hobby

2. The Koi Pond Provides Moments of Peace

3. The Hobby Has a Great Social Factor

4. Keeping Koi Offers a Good Challenge

5. Koi Are a Reactive Pet

6. You Can Trade and Sell the Fry

To read more on this story, click here: Top 5 Benefits You'll Get From Owning Pet Koi



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WHEN AND WHY TO STOP FEEDING YOUR KOI FISH IN WINTER


We’re moving into the winter season, and temperatures are dropping. You might be thinking about your koi pond and how your koi will fare during the winter months.

Your fish will be just fine, but colder weather does mean you need to adjust your feeding schedule.

Here’s how your koi feeding schedule will change as the temperature falls – even to the point where you stop feeding them until the spring.

HOW WEATHER AFFECTS FEEDING SCHEDULE

As the air temperature falls, your koi pond water temperature will drop. There’s a direct relationship between water temperature and koi feeding because your koi’s digestive system slows down as the temperature does (with one exception).

To read more on this story, click here: WHEN AND WHY TO STOP FEEDING YOUR KOI FISH IN WINTER




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How To Raise Koi Fish In A Pond?


Koi fish are renowned as an easy-to-raised specie and if raising them successfully, you might earn a fortune from them.

However, there are still some certain requirements that you should keep in mind before bringing them home, such as pond sizes, expenses, living environments, and how to feed them. Rest assured, all will be told in this article.

To read more on this story, click here: How To Raise Koi Fish In A Pond?



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Is a Fish the Right Pet for You? 7 Reasons Why It Might Not Be


Are you considering buying a pet fish?

Excellent choice!

But they certainly are not for everyone.

I have had pet fish for quite some time now…

Over 30 years, in fact. Where does the time go?

During this time I have actively been involved in online fish forums, local meetups and helped many, many beginners overcome problems with their aquarium setup.

You would be amazed at how often I hear this phrase uttered by beginners after receiving advice:

Ugh… If I knew that, I never would have considered fish as a pet!

What are these deal breakers?

That’s exactly what I am going to reveal in this guide.

If at any point while reading this, you think to yourself:

I don’t like the sound of that…

Then I highly recommend considering a different pet for you and your family.

Which brings me to my first point…

To read more on this story, click here: Is a Fish the Right Pet for You? 7 Reasons Why It Might Not Be




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Saturday, March 6, 2021

'Massive' Goldfish Weighing 9 Pounds Found in South Carolina Lake


A goldfish weighing nine pounds came under the spotlight Monday after being discovered during a fish population survey at a lake in South Carolina, park officials said.

Ty Houck, an official with Greenville County Parks, said the “massive” fish was found swimming on Nov. 16 in a 12-acre body of water in Oak Grove Lake Park in the county of Greenville.

Greenville Rec, which oversees the park where the fish was discovered, posted a photo of the golden spectacle on Facebook on Monday.

To read more on this story, click here: 'Massive' Goldfish Weighing 9 Pounds Found in South Carolina Lake 


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Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Common Freshwater Tropical Fish Diseases


Learn about common fish illnesses and how to effectively treat them.

Looking into your aquarium and seeing one of your fish ill for the first time can be alarming for many hobbyists. Unlike cats and dogs, you can’t just hop in the car and take them to the vet. Moreover, because of the delicate nature of tropical fish, if not treated quickly, the illness may not only kill the infected fish, it could spread to the rest of the tank potentially harming your entire population.

So the obvious question for fish owners when their fish is infected is, “What illness does my fish have and how can I treat it?” The good news is that many of the most common aquarium fish diseases are treatable and if done properly, your fish has a good chance of survival. Moreover, many of the treatments are relatively simple to perform (and a lot cheaper than taking a cat or a dog to the vet).

To read more on this story, click here:  Common Freshwater Tropical Fish Diseases


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Sunday, August 16, 2020

This Aquarium Has Been Closed For Almost Five Months - Now, It's Using Old Wishing Coins To Help Care For Its Animals


For one aquarium, the coins tossed into its waterfall as wishes have become something more than submerged hopes and dreams. The North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores said it's transforming the forgotten change into cold, hard cash.

The public aquarium said in a Facebook post Saturday that its staff turned off its 30-foot-tall "Smoky Mountain" waterfall and rounded up all of the change visitors had tossed in.

To read more on this story, click here: This Aquarium Has Been Closed For Almost Five Months - Now, It's Using Old Wishing Coins To Help Care For Its Animals



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Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Goldfish Survive 4 Months After New Zealand Earthquake


Two goldfish were found alive in their tank in a building that was badly damaged by the earthquake that struck New Zealand.

The two goldfish, named Shaggy and Daphne, have become the smallest survivors of the earthquake in February.  The earthquake killed 181 people in Christchurch.

There were originally six goldfish in the tank when the quake struck. When the survivors were found, there was no trace of three others. A fourth was found dead. There is the question of their missing companions. Goldfish are omnivores.

The fish spent four and a half months, trapped in their tank in a downtown area of the city, that was off-limits. There was no food, or electricity to power their tank filter. They were discovered by workers, and rescued.

The fish survived from eating algae growing on the tank’s rocks and walls. Fish can go without food for a while because they are cold blooded, and unlike mammals don't burn up food to keep warm.



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Saturday, November 10, 2018

How to Care for Oranda Goldfish


If you are both aquarium enthusiasts, you may want to consider oranda goldfish as your first pets together. These beautiful fish develop large hoods called wens on their heads and are as friendly as they are attractive. Understanding proper care for these delicate fish is vital for their longevity.

Educate yourself on the specific needs of oranda goldfish. Common goldfish such as the shubunken have flat, long bodies; but orandas have large, round bodies that make them slow swimmers -- they do not compete well for food with more active species. Their hooded heads are also prone to disease from bacteria and unclean water, so they are not tolerant to polluted water. In addition, unlike other types of goldfish, orandas must have stable water temperatures: not too cold, because they do not thrive if the temperatures in their tanks dips too low.

Choose a tank suitable for your fancy goldfish. Orandas do best in tanks that provide plenty of room to swim. In addition, these hardy fish may reach sizes of 10 to 12 inches (25cm to 30cm) in length, making a spacious home necessary. A long or rectangular tank with capacity of at least 20 to 30 gallons (76l to 114l) will give your pets the space they need to thrive.

Set up your fancy aquatic pets' tank with a filter and heater. Because orandas do not do well in dirty water, a filtration system will help keep their watery environment fresh and clean. An aquarium heater is a must for these fancy fish that are prone to temperature shock if their water temperatures dip too low.

To read more on this story, click here: How to Care for Oranda Goldfish

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Wednesday, November 7, 2018

How To Keep Your Tank Safe During A Power Outage


A power outage may only be a minor inconvenience for you but, for your aquarium fish, it can be deadly.

A power outage is a minor convenience for most people – it simply means that you have to take a break from television, computer, and charging your cell phone. As long as the outage doesn’t last too long there will likely be no damage done. When it comes to your aquarium, however, a power outage can be a major problem. In order to maintain the delicate balance in your tank you need to keep your filtration system and heater running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Whether the outage lasts for a few hours or a few days, there are several things you can do to minimize the damage.

Types of Power Outages

Before getting into the details of how to protect your aquarium during a power outage, it is important that you understand that different types of outages will affect your aquarium in different ways. A localized power outage occurs when the main source of power to the aquarium is disrupted. This could be due to a power strip coming unplugged or a fuse being blown. In some cases the problem is easily remedied – you can just plug the cord back in or flip the switch on the circuit breaker. If the problem is due to an equipment malfunction, like a cracked heater, you may not even realize the problem right away. You may want to consider installing a plug-in alarm that will alert you if the power to your tank is interrupted – this is an especially good investment if you have a very large tank full of expensive fish. It is also a good idea that you use different plugs for different pieces of equipment so they do not all go out at once in the event of a localized power outage.

To read more on this story, click here: How To Keep Your Tank Safe During A Power Outage


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Thursday, October 18, 2018

Tropical Fish Diseases


A home aquarium can host a large variety of bacterial, fungal & parasitic infections. Early treatment is best but there are few things you can do to increase the chance everyone will heal quickly.

Most illnesses are contagious so medicating the entire tank is suggested. Even if the disease is not contagious, it’s not going to harm a healthy fish to give him a dose of treatment too.

If you have a large aquarium it’s advised to set up a hospital tank. Use a smaller 5 gallon aquarium with air pump to place infected fish. Treating a 5 gallon tank is much easier and cheaper then treating a 90 gallon, hence the popularity of hospital tanks for advanced hobbyists and fish breeders.

Always remove carbon for the duration of treatment. In a power filter, you will need to remove the entire cartridge (carbon is located inside). Carbon absorbs medication from the water rending the treatment ineffective.

Adding freshwater aquarium salt helps with healing. A general tonic with electrolytes promoting good health, salt also can counteract the harsh effect of medication by reducing stress. Dissolve some in a cup of water before adding to the aquarium. Follow directions on the box for the proper amount to add according to tank size.

 Most diseases are caused by stress & poor water quality. After the disease outbreak is cleared, you may want to increase the frequency of water changes and perhaps consider using a stronger filter or adding a second filter. Excellent filtration can help prevent disease by keeping water chemistry prime for living conditions.

To read more on this story, click here: Tropical Fish Diseases 

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Sunday, July 8, 2018

Did You Know That Goldfish Were One of the First Fish Species to Be Kept in Ponds by Humans


Did you know that the goldfish are one of the most common type of pets in the world? They were one of the first fish species to be kept in ponds by humans. By nature, goldfish are social creatures and prefer to live with other goldfish.


Many people think that goldfish are pets for someone who doesn't have much time for pet care. The lifespan of your goldfish depend upon how much care you provide goldfish.  If cared for properly your goldfish could live for many years!

Goldfish start off small, but grow to be quite large, sometimes even a foot long, if you take good care of them. First time goldfish keepers usually buy a small tank or bowl to house their goldfish, only to discover that they need to keep buying ever-larger replacement tanks. You should buy a large enough tank at the beginning. You should provide a 20 to 30 gallon tank for your fish. Then add at least 10 gallons to that volume for each additional goldfish you might add. They grow large, excrete a lot of waste and need room to swim in order to be happy!

Food:    Goldfish like a diet of flakes, pellets, wafers and sticks

Goldfish Facts:

Do goldfish have ears? They have internal ear bones called an otolith that can feel vibrations. Avoid tapping on the glass since it will stress or even kill them.

A goldfish can survive in an outdoor pond where water temperatures dip down below 40*F (5*C). Some ponds might even freeze over during the winter and the goldfish still survive through to the spring.



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Monday, November 13, 2017

Goldfish - One Of The Most Common Type Of Pets In The World


Did you know that the goldfish are one of the  most common type of pets in the world? They were one of the first fish species to be kept in ponds by humans. By nature, goldfish are social creatures and prefer to live with other goldfish.

Many people think that goldfish are pets for someone who doesn't have much time for pet care. The lifespan of your goldfish depend upon how much care you provide goldfish.  If  cared for properly your goldfish could live for many years!


Goldfish start off small, but grow to be quite large, sometimes even a foot long, if you take good care of them. First time goldfish keepers usually buy a small tank or bowl to house their goldfish, only to discover that they need to keep buying ever-larger replacement tanks. You should buy a large enough tank at the beginning. You should provide a 20 to 30 gallon tank for your fish. Then add at least 10 gallons to that volume for each additional goldfish you might add. They grow large, excrete a lot of waste and need room to swim in order to be happy!


Food:    Goldfish like a diet of flakes, pellets, wafers and sticks


Goldfish Facts:

Do goldfish have ears? They have internal ear bones called an otolith that can feel vibrations. Avoid tapping on the glass since it will stress or even kill them.

A goldfish can survive in an outdoor pond where water temperatures dip down below 40*F (5*C). Some ponds might even freeze over during the winter and the goldfish still survive through to the spring.


      Exterior Parts of A Goldfish







                         

Goldfish Synchronized Swimming



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Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Inky the Octopus Slipped Through a Gap at the Top of His Enclosure: Escapes Down Pipe to Ocean


By the time the staff at New Zealand’s National Aquarium noticed that he was missing, telltale suction cup prints were the main clue to an easily-solved mystery.

Inky had said see ya to his tank-mate, slipped through a gap left by maintenance workers at the top of his enclosure and, as evidenced by the tracks, made his way across the floor to a six-inch-wide drain. He squeezed his football-sized body in — octopuses are very malleable, aquarium manager Rob Yarrall told the New Zealand website Stuff — and made a break for the Pacific.

“He managed to make his way to one of the drain holes that go back to the ocean. And off he went,” Yarrall told Radio New Zealand. “And he didn’t even leave us a message.”

The cephalopod version of “Shawshank Redemption” took place three months ago, but it only became public Tuesday. Inky, who already had some local renown in the coastal city of Napier, quickly became a global celebrity cheered on by strangers.

Inky had resided at the aquarium since 2014, when he was taken in after being caught in a crayfish pot, his body scarred and his arms injured. The octopus’s name was chosen from nominations submitted to a contest run by the Napier City Council.

Kerry Hewitt, the aquarium’s curator of exhibits, said at the time that Inky was “getting used to being at the aquarium” but added that staff would “have to keep Inky amused or he will get bored.”

Guess that happened.

This isn’t the first time a captive octopus decided to take matters into its own hands — er, tentacles. In 2009, after a two-spotted octopus at the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium in California took apart a water recycling valve, directed a tube to shoot water out of the tank for 10 hours and caused a massive flood, Scientific American asked octopus expert Jennifer Mather about the animals’ intelligence and previous such hijinks at aquariums.

“They are very strong, and it is practically impossible to keep an octopus in a tank unless you are very lucky. … Octopuses simply take things apart,” Mather said. “I recall reading about someone who had built a robot submarine to putter around in a large aquarium tank. The octopus got a hold of it and took it apart piece by piece. There’s a famous story from the Brighton Aquarium in England 100 years ago that an octopus there got out of its tank at night when no one was watching, went to the tank next door and ate one of the lumpfish and went back to his own tank and was sitting there the next morning.”

Yarrall said the aquarium has no plans to replace Inky, but it does intend to better secure the tank where now just one octopus remains.

“They are always exploring and they are great escape artists,” Yarrall said, according to Hawke’s Bay Today. “We’ll be watching the other one.”


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Monday, February 8, 2016

Hermit Crabs Make Adorable Pets: But These Little Packages of Cuteness Are High-Maintenance


Hermit crabs make adorable pets but these little packages of cuteness are high-maintenance and require very exacting care

Hermit crabs are widely believed to be easy to care for, and ideal first pets for children. Neither of these beliefs is true. Unfortunately, hermit crabs are very difficult to keep healthy, and they should be kept in groups. Not only are hermit crabs are not hermit-like at all, they are gregarious partiers who will keep a crab-party going all night.

You’ve probably seen the clear plastic critter-carriers and one-gallon fish tanks where hermit crabs are sometimes displayed. These are not safe homes for hermit crabs. In fact, if the critter-carrier has a standard “berry-basket” top for ventilation, the crab inside is probably already dying a slow and painful death. Hermit crabs breathe air through modified gills. They will drown in water, and they have no lungs. If the gills ever dry out, the animal is in serious trouble. The resulting death by suffocation can take months, but it is inevitable. Therefore, maintaining sufficient humidity in the hermit crab enclosure is very, very important.

This brings us to the topic of equipment.

ESSENTIAL EQUIPMENT

This list is a very rudimentary introduction to the equipment needed to keep crabs healthy.

  • An aquarium tank, marine terrarium, or large covered enclosure strong enough to contain wet sand. Be sure the cover is tight enough to prevent the crabs from pushing their way out, that some air can get in, and that it keeps moisture inside the tank;
  • Water-conditioning fluid, to neutralize chlorine and its by-products in the water;
  • Safe sea salt, of the kind sold for marine fish and crustaceans;
  • Safe sand, enough to be a few inches (15cm minimum) deep in the tank;
  • Water dishes, sea sponges, shallow food dishes, and a slotted scoop to remove uneaten food from the sand;
  • Quarantine tank, which is basically the full set-up in miniature, for safe moulting;
  • Hidey-huts for the crabs to relax in, during the day;
  • Extra shells of the correct sizes and shapes, at least three per crab;
  • Thermometers for the sand and hygrometers for the main tank and the quarantine tank;
  • Branches and rocks to climb on;
  • Moss and extra sea sponges for soaking, to help keep the humidity above 75%; and
  • Heater for one end of the tank: most hermit crab species like a temperature of 75-80F/24-27C on the warm end of the tank.

EXERCISE

These cute little crustaceans will keep themselves fit, presuming their tank is big enough. They love to climb, and crawl, and pull. If you are very careful, you can “walk” them across your hands held low over a soft surface. As the crab moves across one hand, bring the other one around in front. To do this, your hands need to be positioned side to side, and not fingertip-to-fingertip. Otherwise, the surface will be too narrow and the tiny crab will become frightened.

FEEDING

Hermit crabs are beachcombing scavengers. As omnivores, they require both meat and plant-matter in their diets. Unfortunately, the commercial crab foods do not make a good diet for hermit crabs. They tend to contain preservatives, but some are safe enough: read the ingredient list. The real problem is that commercial foods are boring. Crabs don’t like to smell the same meal twice in a row. They will be happiest if every meal is a little different: some fish and a touch of apple today, perhaps some chicken and seaweed tomorrow.  (Thacker, 1998).

Wash all fruits and vegetables before feeding them to your crabs, and use de-chlorinated water to do it. Always do everything you can to keep your crabs away from chlorine. Meat can be raw or cooked, or even freeze-dried, but avoid preservatives (including salt).

That’s not to say that everything always needs to be fresh. Stock up on an assortment of jars of baby foods. Keep some freeze-dried daphnia, bloodworms, tubifex, and shrimp on hand from the aquarium section of the pet store. Offer a few pieces of low-salt cat food.

Crabs need calcium. The simplest way to provide it is to drop a couple of cuttlebones onto the floor of the tank. Cuttlebone is sold in the pet-bird section of the pet store.

Unlike many animals, hermit crabs need two kinds of water bowls: one with freshwater and one with salt water. The salt water cannot be made with table salt, because of the iodine in it. Both bowls need to be big enough for the crabs to submerge themselves, and easy to crawl out of so the crabs don’t drown. A piece of sea sponge in each bowl makes a convenient safety raft.


GROOMING

The hermit crab tank needs to contain a conditioned freshwater bowl and a conditioned saltwater bowl. The precise details of these will vary with the particular species you keep.

Along with the water that the crabs will use for “grooming” themselves, these creatures must be provided with an assortment of appropriate shells. The shapes will vary, again according to species, but whatever the species you should provide at least three shells per crab in your tank. The shell sizes should be slightly smaller than, equal to, and slightly larger than the crab’s current shell. Please, please, please stay away from painted shells. The “non-toxic” paints are meant to be non-toxic to your children: they are generally not safe for your hermit crabs.

HOME ENVIRONMENT

Hermit crabs are primarily nocturnal. They enjoy exploring their home, re-arranging things, and seeing how many of them can sit on a perch before it falls over. You’ll hear them clacking away with their claws through the wee hours. If you do most of your sleeping at night, you probably don’t want to put the crab tanks in the bedroom.

Also, keep in mind that hermit crabs are invertebrates who are subject to the same kinds of poisons that are used to kill insects and spiders. If people in your neighborhood spray their lawns, or if someone in your house tends to go after spiders with a can of “bug-spray”, hermit crabs are not for you.


TRAINING

There is no training required for hermit crabs. While you will need to rescue them from time to time, especially during moults, and you’ll need to provide appropriate shells for them to choose from, they will act according to their natures.


WHERE TO NEXT?

Are these little guys right for you? They are adorable, no question, but they are very difficult for beginners to keep healthy and happy. In many ways, parrots and the licensed exotics are easier to maintain. Perhaps consider a dog instead? Or a pony?

If you have decided that hermit crabs are the right pet for your family, the next step is to do some reading. This care-sheet has only introduced you to the barest skim off the top of the information you need. Investigate the details of putting together a proper enclosure, and the details of shell replacement, and the details of temperature and humidity. Next, put together the main tank and a quarantine tank, and monitor the humidity and temperature for a week or two. Once that is stable, seek out several healthy crabs and a nice assortment of high-quality shells for them.






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Sunday, December 27, 2015

True Story: Man Finds Half Fish and Keeps It as Pet for Six Months



A fish which lost its tail, and half its body, when it tried to leap out of a cement-lined pond no doubt thought its future looked bleak.

Amazingly, it survived its ordeal... only to end up in a tank in a Thai market, where it could well have spent its dying days.

But one man who spotted the poor creature took pity on it, adopted it and brought it home.

Watchara Chote, from Ratchaburi, named his new pet I-Half.

After its horrific accident, the fish - a hypsibarbus wetmorei - fractured its bones.

These eventually wasted away, causing the tail to fall off, according to Matichon News, the Mirror reported.

However, Chote, 36, and I-Half, were able to enjoy each other's company for six months.

During this time, he took his wonder pet to several villages to show it off.

But then, sadly, his aqua buddy passed away- whereupon well-wishers donated money for him to buy a tiny coffin.

Still, not a bad innings for a fish with half a body.





This fish lost its tail - and half its body - when it tried to leap out of a cement-lined pond.



The injured creature was spotted by Watchara Chote in a market in Thailand. He took pity on it and took it home.



Chote, 36, and his new chum - whom he named I-Half - were able to enjoy each other's company for six months.



.. but then I-Half died. Chote had taken great pride in showing off his fish to villagers, who clubbed together to buy a tiny, fishy coffin.


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Monday, June 1, 2015

Floating ‘Wheelchairs’ Like These Help Sick Fish with Buoyancy Problems Stay Upright


This is the most adorable animal wheelchair we’ve ever seen. An image has surfaced of a goldfish in a sling, which people are calling a ‘goldfish wheelchair,’ designed to keep her afloat and upright.

‘Fish wheelchairs’ (or slings or buoys – call them what you will) like these are used to help fish swim upright while they recover from swim bladder infections that make it difficult for them to do so on their own. 

Green peas can help solve buoyancy issues related to constipation, but infected swim bladders or other issues may require specialized medication. Always consult your vet!

Using a simple cork, this owner saved his fish’s life


Floating ‘wheelchairs’ like these help sick fish stay upright

Swim bladder infections or constipation can make it hard or impossible to swim with balance


There are professional veterinary versions, too!



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