The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Pig The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Pig
Showing posts with label Pig. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pig. Show all posts

Monday, October 19, 2020

It’s Illegal To Own Just One Guinea Pig In Switzerland Because They Get Lonely


Guinea pigs are adorable creatures who are often kept as pets. While most people immediately think of a cat or dog when contemplating a family pet, guinea pigs bring something a bit more unusual to the table (and can be a fine option for those who are allergic to cats and dogs).

Guinea pigs can be very loving and are totally lovable themselves. But, like many creatures, they can get lonely — even with an incredibly caring human owner. So it’s important that they have another guinea pig around to keep them company.

While this is just a suggestion in most countries, it’s the law in Switzerland.

To read more on this story, click here: It’s Illegal To Own Just One Guinea Pig In Switzerland Because They Get Lonely



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Sunday, August 23, 2020

Do You Think People Should Have Their Pets Tattooed?



What is our society thinking?...or are they! I hope these pictures are photoshopped.


Apparently, a new trend is getting tattoos put on your pets, particularly any pet that is hairless. In Russia, the hairless Sphinx is the most frequent tattoo victim. Yes, I said victim.

In the 1980s before the microchip was invented for identifying pets, it wasn’t uncommon to tattoo pets with an identification number, often on their inner ear or bellies while they were under anesthesia for another procedure such as spaying or neutering. I think animals should never, ever be put under just for a tattoo.

Note: some of the images may be photoshopped. Very hard to verify.



    Body Modified Dog - Thank GOD this one is totally photoshopped. I hope.




Cosmetic Tattoos - This poor Dalmatian had a pink nose, which is a failure in the breed standard. So his owner got his nose tattooed.



In the ear tattoos - Dogs are often tattooed in their ears, usually with an ID number to help find them if they get lost. But this whole image thing is new.



Sphinx Cat with Ink - By far the most common pet that gets tattooed appears to be the hairless breeds, such as the Sphinx cat pictured here. This could be fake/photoshopped, but it looks pretty much like human tattoos do.



  Jack Russel Belly Tattoo - So this poor dog got a Hello Kitty tattoo on it's belly.



Cat immediately post-tattoo - In this photo, the cat is still anesthetized following it's tattoo. I found several shots of this cat being tattooed while under, so I do think it's real. It's a beautiful tattoo. Just wish it was on someone that could give consent.



                              It's likely these are fake...I hope.




Yes, another hairless Sphinx sporting what looks like real ink. That's a lot of ink for a little cat. I'd say it took 3 hours at least.




Daschund Belly Ink - This little guy has a tiny tattoo on his belly. Likely done when it was spayed/neutered and didn't take too much time.




 Louis Vutton Pigs - Apparently, tattooing pigs is a HUGE thing. Seriously, 
      google it. Scary.




                                         Small Tribal on a Sphinx




                         Demon bat wings tattooed on both sides...sad!




                                                    Tattooed Pigs

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Saturday, August 22, 2020

Ontario Passes Ag-Gag Bill Making It Illegal To Expose Animal Abuse On Farms


Animals are voiceless and rely on humans to stand up for them, but the recently passed Bill 156 in Ontario, Canada, just made it illegal to expose animal abuse on farms.

Bill 156, the Security from Trespass and Protecting Food Safety Act, is a typical Ag-Gag law making it illegal for employees or undercover activists to report the animal abuse they witness on farms, and prohibiting protesters from documenting transport conditions of animals arriving at slaughterhouses

To read more on this story, click here: Ontario Passes Ag-Gag Bill Making It Illegal To Expose Animal Abuse On Farms






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Sunday, August 16, 2020

“Sheep Pigs” Are Real And They’re Like Giant Fuzzy Dogs


We all know that sheep are quite fuzzy animals, which is part of their charm as farm animals. But when we think of pigs, we definitely don’t envision hairy animals. Quite the opposite, we think of pigs as being relatively sparse with their fur and constantly dunking themselves in mud in order to stay cool.

However, there is a “sheep pig” out there, and they’re quite the unusual-looking animal. The Mangalitsa pig is an actual fuzzy pig! They have the outward appearance of a sheep with the wooly coat, but they’re actually bred to be pets since they’re quite tamable. The breeder of the Mangalitsa pig has stated that they can be tamed just like dogs if they’re shown the right affection. As a result, these pigs have been known to follow around their owners or play with their owners – just like a dog!

To read more on this story, click here: “Sheep Pigs” Are Real And They’re Like Giant Fuzzy Dogs



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Friday, May 3, 2019

Escaped Pet Pig Slaughtered by ‘Helpful’ Neighbor in California


A California family’s missing pet pig was found but while police went to get the animal’s owners, someone slaughtered their beloved pet.

Princess the pig—a 400-pound sow—had escaped her enclosure at owner Carrie Hogan’s mother’s house in Arcata, California, on March 23, according to MailOnline.

The pig wandered around the neighborhood and was spotted by locals.

Humboldt Paws Cause, a lost and found pets service in Humboldt County, California, posted photos of the missing pig on its Facebook page.

“Found a massive pig in our yard this morning up Fickle Hill,” Humboldt Paws Cause wrote, citing an individual named Brianne.

A lively discussion ensued about animals on the loose and whether the missing animal was a pot-bellied pig or someone’s 4H/FFA youth development project.

“That’s not a potbelly that’s a Hampshire/ mix probably for FAA or 4H it looks pretty young. Hope it finds its home!!” wrote Anna Marie.

“Buffalo on the highways and a piggy strolling around Arcata! Lol only in Humboldt!! Yee haw!!” commented Susan Wentworth.

To read more on this story, click here: Escaped Pet Pig Slaughtered by ‘Helpful’ Neighbor in California

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Tuesday, October 16, 2018

San Bernardino County Sheriff's Deputies Corral A Large Pig With Doritos


San Bernardino County Sheriff's deputies in California had to reach into their bag of tricks — or lunch bag of tricks — to corral a portly pig that had gotten loose.

The two deputies from the Highland station responded to a call of a pig "the size of a mini horse" wandering the streets. They decided the path of least resistance was to sacrifice a bit of their lunch to create a trail of chips to entice the pig back home.

         (Click arrow 2 times to start video)


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Friday, August 3, 2018

Some Unusual Shelter Animals You May Not Have Known You Could Adopt


Although dogs and cats remain by far the most common pet to rescue and adopt, other kinds of animals do end up in shelters. From farm animals to small rodents and even reptiles, there are plenty of options if you’re looking to bring home a different kind of furry or scaly — friend.

While some of these animals end up in shelters because an owner moves away, plenty of them are abandoned by “impulse buyers” who change their mind after buying a needy breed of pig or chinchilla, experts say.

For that reason, Dana Puglisi of AdoptaPet.com, which has listings for more than a dozen species of shelter animals, said that it’s important to read up on animal needs if you’re interested in adopting an atypical pet.

“It’s very easy to look at an animal and say, ‘That’s such a cute animal, I want it to be a part of my life,” Puglisi tells NBC. “It’s another thing to take on the actual day-to-day responsibility for caring for that pet.” 

In addition, some states have restrictions on what kind of animal you can keep as a pet, so Puglisi said she also suggests checking local laws before reaching out to a shelter.

Below are some of the unusual shelter animals you may not have known you could adopt:


Cows
Holy cow, indeed! In areas with more farmland, shelters and sanctuaries like Animal Place in Grass Valley, Calif. may have cows that were rescued from factories. Be sure you have the space and resources to adopt a shelter cow, though, as they need at least 80 square feet of space and over 20 gallons of water a day.




Chinchillas
According to ChinchillaRescue.org, chinchillas are noisy and nocturnal, so it’s best to avoid keeping them in their new owner’s bedroom. Since rescue chinchillas are of unknown parentage and may not be neutered, owners should plan to keep them apart from opposite-sex chins in order to avoid accidental breeding.




Pigs
The right breed of pig can make for an adorable rescue animal — and a shelter is often the best way to find one. Puglisi said that more and more pig owners are abandoning their pets after being tricked into bringing home baby farm pigs that put on hundreds of pounds as they grow up. If you have the space, you can adopt one of these larger abandoned pigs, but shelters also have plenty of smaller breeds, like Vietnamese miniature pot-bellies.




Parrots
Parrots (as well as other tropical birds like parakeets) are often left behind at shelters when owners move away or become unable to keep caring for these sometimes needy birds. As with some other animals on this list, though, be sure to check local regulations if you choose to adopt — parrots aren’t allowed to be kept as pets in some states.



Goats
If there’s anything to learn from the recent goat yoga fitness craze, it’s that these farm animals can serve as fun, furry additions to the family. While regular-size goats can be found in some shelters, a few also have pint-sized pygmy goats up for adoption for anyone short on space. Who knows, they might even eat the weeds in your yard.



Horses
Equestrian lovers can adopt either full-size or miniature horses, like Smooshy, a dwarf miniature horse adopted by actress Kaley Cuoco of “The Big Bang Theory.” Mini-horses in particular are seeing a surge in shelters right now, Puglisi said, as “impulse buyers” purchase and then abandon the horses they use to emulate celebrity horse owners.




Snakes
From king snakes to corn snakes to Colombian boa constrictors, there’s plenty of shelter serpents snakes that you can adopt into your home. Most snakes are carnivores or omnivores, and they require a steady diet of other animals in order to be well-fed — so be prepared to keep “mousicles” inside your freezer.




Ferrets
These tail-wagging mammals make for active, friendly pets to adopt or even house temporarily through foster programs for older or sick ferrets. Watch your fingers, though — ferrets are also known for biting.



Bearded Dragons
They may not be quite like the Viking pets in “How to Train Your Dragon,” but shelter bearded dragons can let you support shelters while (sort of) living out a mythical animal fantasy. Sometimes known as “beardies,” these reptiles originated in central Australia and are often kept in zoos. They’re considered one of the easiest reptiles to care for, but still need a specific light pattern and large tank.

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Thursday, June 28, 2018

Commonly Seen Diseases that Affect Pet Guinea Pigs


While there is no official record of the most commonly seen diseases that affect pet guinea pigs there is still a subjective opinion that is felt through the guinea pig community regarding common ailments of pet cavies. By knowing what is most commonly seen you can be better prepared to monitor for signs and symptoms that your guinea pig may be getting sick.

Ileus
Guinea pigs should always be eating and defecating. If you see your guinea pig hasn't touched his food and you are seeing less and fewer stools being passed your guinea pig may have ileus. Ileus is when gas builds up in the gastrointestinal tract (stomach and intestines) and due to the lack of normal peristalsis and no food coming in it causes discomfort and the gas is unable to leave the body. This is actually a very life-threatening condition and your guinea pig should receive immediate medical attention to get the proper medications.

Ileus can be caused secondarily by an underlying illness or stressor which in turn causes your guinea pig to stop eating. Things as simple as moving the cage, introducing a new guinea pig, an upper respiratory infection, and even ectoparasites like lice can stress your guinea pig out enough so that he doesn't eat and develops ileus.

Ectoparasites
If your guinea pig has hair loss and is itching or scratching he may have lice or mites. While the thought of having these things in your house, much less on the guinea pig you just played with, may make you itch all over they can be easy to avoid and treat. Lice, sarcoptic mange mites (scabies), and Demodex mange mites (Demodex) can all cause itching and hair loss. Lice and their eggs are usually seen in the bald patches behind your guinea pig's ears and the mites can be seen microscopically all over the body.

Guinea pigs can give these parasites to each other and can also get them from food and bedding. By freezing your food and bedding before introducing it into the cage you can kill off any potential parasites that may have been lurking in the packages.

Uterine and Ovarian Diseases
Spaying your female guinea pig is definitely recommended for more than just population control if she is housed with a male cavy. Females often develop uterine and ovarian issues including various cancers. Sometimes the uterus and ovaries can be removed even after the problem has been discovered but other times cancer has already spread to other parts of the body rendering it untreatable. A complete ovariohysterectomy can be performed by your exotics vet on your guinea pig at about six months of age to prevent uterine and ovarian diseases just as it would in a dog or cat. While some guinea pig owners are not able to justify the cost of the procedure others see the great benefit to having their guinea pigs longer and not having to pay for emergency treatment when they notice their pig is sick.

Respiratory Diseases
Guinea pigs are sensitive to cold air drafts and can easily develop an upper respiratory infection or worse yet, pneumonia. They can even get Bordatella bronchiseptica from your dog, cat, or pet rabbit. Simply keeping your cavies away from drafts will help decrease the likelihood of them getting a respiratory infection as well as washing your hands after handling other animals (guinea pigs at pet stores, your dog or cat if they are coughing or sneezing, and even your rabbit).

Uroliths
More commonly referred to as bladder stones, uroliths often form in the bladder of pet guinea pigs. They cause pain and discomfort and the urine is often bloody due to the irritation the stone causes. Stones are often found on radiographs being taken for a diagnosis of ileus and must be surgically removed.

By keeping a close watch on your guinea pig by making sure is he eating and defecating, washing your hands before and after handling him, freezing his bedding and food before use, and keeping him away from drafts you can prevent the bulk of the most commonly seen guinea pig diseases. There are of course numerous other diseases that affect guinea pigs, therefore, an annual physical examination with your exotics vet is always recommended.



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Saturday, June 23, 2018

Do You Think People Should Have Their Pets Tattooed?



What is our society thinking?...or are they! I hope these pictures are photoshopped.

Apparently, a new trend is getting tattoos put on your pets, particularly any pet that is hairless. In Russia, the hairless Sphinx is the most frequent tattoo victim. Yes, I said victim.

In the 1980s before the microchip was invented for identifying pets, it wasn’t uncommon to tattoo pets with an identification number, often on their inner ear or bellies while they were under anesthesia for another procedure such as spaying or neutering. I think animals should never, ever be put under just for a tattoo.

Note: some of the images may be photoshopped. Very hard to verify.



    Body Modified Dog - Thank GOD this one is totally photoshopped. I hope.




Cosmetic Tattoos - This poor Dalmatian had a pink nose, which is a failure in the breed standard. So his owner got his nose tattooed.



In the ear tattoos - Dogs are often tattooed in their ears, usually with an ID number to help find them if they get lost. But this whole image thing is new.



Sphinx Cat with Ink - By far the most common pet that gets tattooed appears to be the hairless breeds, such as the Sphinx cat pictured here. This could be fake/photoshopped, but it looks pretty much like human tattoos do.



  Jack Russel Belly Tattoo - So this poor dog got a Hello Kitty tattoo on it's belly.



Cat immediately post-tattoo - In this photo, the cat is still anesthetized following it's tattoo. I found several shots of this cat being tattooed while under, so I do think it's real. It's a beautiful tattoo. Just wish it was on someone that could give consent.



                              It's likely these are fake...I hope.




Yes, another hairless Sphinx sporting what looks like real ink. That's a lot of ink for a little cat. I'd say it took 3 hours at least.




Daschund Belly Ink - This little guy has a tiny tattoo on his belly. Likely done when it was spayed/neutered and didn't take too much time.




 Louis Vutton Pigs - Apparently, tattooing pigs is a HUGE thing. Seriously, 
      google it. Scary.




                                         Small Tribal on a Sphinx




                         Demon bat wings tattooed on both sides...sad!




                                                    Tattooed Pigs

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Thursday, December 14, 2017

'Pig-Bull' Steals Hearts With Pig-Like Appearance


STATESVILLE, N.C. -- A pitbull that has garnered himself the nickname of "pig-bull" for his eerily similar appearance to that of a pig is in search of his forever home.

"He's my special project," said pitbull advocate and volunteer Jennifer Bradford. "I met him and just fell in love with him, he's so sweet."

"Pig-bull," also known as Casper, is up for adoption through Carolina Big Hearts Big Barks rescue. While he's known for his energetic nature and sweet heart, the two-year-old pitbull has had a hard time getting adopted due to his breed, size and special needs–Casper is deaf.

"He was born deaf," Bradford said. "He knows his hand commands."

To read more on this story, click here: 'Pig-Bull' Steals Hearts With Pig-Like Appearance



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Friday, November 24, 2017

A Startup is Hiring a 'Social Petworking Coach' to Help People Make Their Furry Friends Instagram Stars


The bizarre world of social media fame has reached a new level of weirdness.

Petlandia, a London-based company that makes books featuring people's pets as the star, is looking for the world's first "social petworking coach" to help people turn their cat, dog, pig, or other animal friend into a social media star. 

Sound like a joke? It's not. According to Petlandia, one in six pet-owners have social media accounts for their pets (even Mark Zuckerberg's dog Beast has his own Facebook page), and celebrity pets can make enough money from product sponsorships and media appearances to keep their human parents financially afloat.

Job responsibilities for the Petworking coach include creating online webinars for interested humans around the globe, doing private consultations with VIP clients, and mentoring clients on social media best practices and strategies for growing online audiences.

To read more on this story, click here: A Startup is Hiring a 'Social Petworking Coach' to Help People Make Their Furry Friends Instagram Stars

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Saturday, December 17, 2016

San Francisco International Airport Introduced “Lilou” the Therapy Pig


San Francisco International Airport introduced “Lilou” the therapy pig this week as the newest member of the airport’s Wag Brigade. And, not surprisingly, she's the first airport therapy pig in the United States, airport spokesman Doug Yakel said, adding that he's sure she'll be a "big hit" with travelers.

Lilou happily let passengers pet her pink snout and her back (all the while wearing a pilot’s cap and a blue tutu) while walking through the busy terminals. At one point on Monday, Lilou did circles and ate treats to entertain the crowds. Lilou wasn't immediately available to snort and oink for an interview, but of course, she has an Instagram page, where she touted her new gig: "City pig & the 1st pig in SF SPCA AAT program."

One traveler tweeted that she was more excited to meet Lilou than any celebrity.

SFO launched the Wag Brigade in 2013 and Lilou is the first pig to join the ranks of friendly dogs, named Bailey and Biggie, to make “passenger travel more enjoyable.” The dogs — and now, one pig — are trained through the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and certified through their Animal Assisted Therapy Program.

SFSPCA spokeswoman Krista Maloney said the idea for the pig came straight from the swine's owner, Tatyana Danilova.

"She was very interested in having Lilou become certified as a therapy animal," Maloney said. So except for the "sit" and "down" commands, Lilou jumped through the same training hoops that dogs do, and passed with flying colors, Maloney said.

"She's friendly and she's pretty well trained," Maloney said, adding that Lilou also visits hospitals and senior homes to give comfort there as well. "She's also housebroken, which is pretty important in an airport."







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Sunday, October 23, 2016

Screwworm Infecting Key Deer Also Found in Some Sick Pets


It’s not just the Key deer being ravaged by a flesh-eating worm in the Florida Keys. Pets are also starting to turn up with gruesome infections.

While wildlife managers have focused largely on the endangered herd and the 107 deer killed since August, vets say they have treated at least nine suspected cases in dogs, cats, rabbits, pigs and a tortoise. Two feral cats had to be euthanized, said Marathon Veterinary Hospital’s Doug Mader. Those numbers are higher than the three reported by the Florida Department of Agriculture, which only counts cases confirmed in lab tests, largely because of the confirmation process.

“That’s the tough part about this whole thing. You look at them and it walks like a duck, but you have to have confirmation that it’s a duck,” said Keys Animal Hospital veterinarian Kyle Maddox, who treated an infected dog earlier this month.

The discrepancy in numbers, and expanded war on the screwworm that now covers eight islands and this week drew a new team of volunteers fanning out with medicated bread to feed deer, has only increased anxiety among pet owners. Vets, however, stress the risk to pets remains far lower than the peril posed to the wild deer.

To read more on this story, click here: Screwworm Infecting Key Deer Also Found in Some Sick Pets


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Monday, March 21, 2016

After Losing His Beloved Dog: Man Devotes His Life to Adopting Senior Dogs Who Can’t Find Forever Homes


Months kept passing after Steve Greig’s beloved dog died, but he still felt crushed. That’s when he decided he should give another dog a good life. But not just any dog. He went to his local shelter in Denver, Colorado to adopt the “least adoptable” senior dog, as these are the ones too often overlooked. Now, Greig is a super busy human dad to his 10 elder shelter dogs and his Instagram is overloaded with cuteness approved by 478k followers.

Each day Greig wakes up at 5:00 a.m. in the morning to make breakfast for his big family. Most of the dogs have different diets. His schedule is filled with walks in the park, vet appointments…and lots of love and cuddles. “Whenever I sit or lie down at a dog-friendly level, there are always at least three or four of [dogs] attached,” Greig writes on Instagram.

“They’re just wiser animals,” Greig told The Dodo. “You kind of know what you want out of life once you become a certain age. These dogs know who they are and it’s easy to develop a relationship with a person or pet who knows who they are. It’s just fulfilling knowing that these guys are happy and loved and well-taken care of. It makes my days worthwhile.”

Greig also has a pig named Bikini, as well as two ducks, pigeons, cats and a few chickens. He has no more room for pets at the moment but he intends to adopt more senior dogs in the future. Because after all, love sees no age.

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Saturday, March 12, 2016

Cesar Millan, “The Dog Whisperer,” Made Headlines When a Dog Appeared on His Show Attacking a Pig: Officials Visited Millan’s Dog Training Center


Cesar Millan, “The Dog Whisperer,” made headlines when a dog appeared on his show attacking a pig. According to TMZ, an investigation is underway by LA County Animal Control. Officials visited Millan’s dog training center in Santa Clarita, California. Millan was not present, but has been given 24 hours to respond. The call was due to a barrage of complaints flooding in when Millan’s show, Cesar 911, featured the dog attacking and injuring a pig during a training session.


Millan is staunchly defended by NatGeoWild, which airs the show on its channel. But dog trainers all over the country are saying they have been trying to get the message across about Millan’s methods for the past decade.

According to NBC Los Angeles, professional dog trainer Laura Nativo has helped organize a petition calling for the cancellation of Millan’s show. Close to 10,000 people have signed it so far.

Other trainers have echoed these sentiments for years, according to an article by author and internationally acclaimed trainer Jean Donaldson on UrbanDawgs.com.

According to Donaldson, Lisa Laney Patrona, a certified professional dog trainer and a graduate of the Companion Animal Sciences Institute, wrote a letter to National Geographic prior to the airing of The Dog Whisperer.

“The intended program depicts aversive and abusive training methods – treatment for some serious anxiety and fear based issues – being administered by an individual with no formal education whatsoever in canine behavioral sciences. The ‘results’ that are shown are more than likely not long lasting changes, but the result of learned helplessness, or fatigue, neither of which impact behavior to any significant long term degree – at least not in a good way. For those of us who are pioneering the effort to end the ignorance that drives the cruel treatment administered upon our canine companions, it is disappointing to see that this programming will reach the masses – especially on the NatGeo Channel. The ignorance that this program perpetuates will give equally ignorant people the green light to subject their dogs to abuse. In turn these dogs will react even more defensively, will bite more people – and end up dead.”

In a 2006 article in the New York Times, Mark Derr called Milan’s program a “pack of lies.” He points out the sexist angle of Millan’s training.

“Women are the worst offenders in his world. In one of the outtakes included in the four-DVD set of the first season of Dog Whisperer, Mr. Millan explains that a woman is ‘the only species that is wired different from the rest.’ And a ‘woman always applies affection before discipline,’ he says. ‘Man applies discipline then affection, so we’re more psychological than emotional. All animals follow dominant leaders; they don’t follow lovable leaders.'”

In a 2011 blog article by the Huffington Post titled “First Do No Harm,” Law and Order actor and “dog worshiper” Richard Belzer calls out National Geographic for sponsoring Millan.

“The fact that the Dog Whisperer has been nominated for an Emmy should give serious pause to all those in the business who are about to vote for the awards. Dog owners and dog lovers would be disturbingly misled if Mr. Millan and his program are honored in such a high-profile way.”

Chiming in with countless other statements, Dr. Nicholas Dodman, a professor and the head of Animal Behavior at Tufts University, wrote, “Cesar Millan’s methods are based on flooding and punishment. The results, though immediate, will be only transitory. His methods are misguided, outmoded, in some cases dangerous, and often inhumane. You would not want to be a dog under his sphere of influence. The sad thing is that the public does not recognize the error of his ways. My college thinks it is a travesty. We’ve written to National Geographic Channel and told them they have put dog training back 20 years.”

The recent episode where the pig was attacked is not the first time that animal professionals have waved the red flag about Millan. The question is, will National Geographic finally take notice?

Update:
In a report by Fox News, Cesar Millan stated that the public’s reaction to the pig incident was overblown.

“I do have a large group of fans and a small group of people who don’t agree with me. They are taking this the wrong way and blowing it way out of proportion.”

Watch the pig-biting incident in this video by Inside Edition.




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