The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Cats The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Cats
Showing posts with label Cats. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cats. Show all posts

Friday, November 9, 2018

Can Cats And Dogs Really Live Together?


The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) says, Absolutely! Dogs and cats can become fast friends. Ideally, they should become accustomed to the other species as youngsters. This early exposure teaches them that it is normal to co-exist in a household.

The sensitive period of learning regarding social acceptability is between 3 and 12 weeks of age in dogs and between 2 and 7 weeks of age in cats. During this time a plethora of unlikely liaisons can be engineered using appropriate ploys. During the sensitive period it is possible to arrange seemingly impossible feats like lions being made to lie down with lambs. However, it is often not possible to raise kittens with puppies to create such "bon accord au naturelle."  But a huge step in the right direction involves introducing puppies and kittens to friendly members of the opposite species during this window of time.

It is not uncommon for dogs and cats to enjoy each other's company. Take the time to manage your cat-dog introduction properly, and you could be setting up a friendship that will last for the rest your pets' lives.

Can cats and dogs really live together? What do you think?

Facts to consider when cohabiting cats and dogs:

1. Gentle, sweet-natured, or lazy dogs are more likely to be good with cats than strong-willed, active, alert dogs.

2. Strong-willed cats that stand their ground and hiss and spit, or swipe with a paw, are more likely to cope with a new dog, than the timid sort that run from everything.

3. As a cat owner who wants to own a dog, never choose a stray, or ones you don't know the history of.

4. Consider its temperament, breed and past history. Ask the advice of shelter staff, your vet and friends, if you are inexperienced. Choose a cat that has been used to dogs if possible, preferably one which is not timid and shy.

5. Some dogs have a very high predatory drive and cannot be trusted with any small, fast moving creature.

6. Allow your cat to go where it likes, but not to leave the room. Most of these encounters will be, or should be, uneventful.

7. If you are a dog owner who wants to own a cat, think carefully about whether your dog would be suitable first.

8. A word of caution to owners of more than one dog. One dog will act as an individual, more than one will act as a pack which could have dire consequences for a new cat.

9. Introductions must be supervised, and they must be handled with planning, care and patience.

10. Ask if the dog has been used to living with cats and take the advice of shelter staff on the likelihood of it settling with cats.

11. .Do not force them together, let them move at their own speed - which will probably be very slowly.

12. You will need time and patience if these two animals from entirely different species are to become friends. It probably will happen eventually, but until you are absolutely sure, do not leave them alone together.





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Thursday, November 8, 2018

Teaching Your Cat How To Walk On A Leash


The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) says, Teaching your cat to walk on a harness and leash is a great way to let your cat enjoy the outdoors while ensuring his safety.

There is an old belief that it is grossly unfair to confine such a free-spirited animal to the indoors. Some people believe that cats should never be outdoors.

If you would like to give your cat an opportunity to explore the out-of-doors safely, leash-training them is an ideal way to do it..

Whether your cat is exclusively indoors, or an indoor-outdoor variety, there are times you'll need to keep him confined with a leash. Even older cats can be trained, given patience.

The first thing to remember is that cats don't walk on a leash like a dog. They will want to go in the direction they choose, rather than following you.

Tips on walking your cat on a leash:

1. The key to successful training is do it slowly, about 5 minutes at a time each day. Gradually increasing the time the harness is worn. Let the cat get use to wearing it around the house.

2. At first the cat will not want to move around. After it has accepted wearing the harness, then add the leash and encourage the cat to walk to get something it wants like a food treat or toy.

3. A lot of praise and good kitty also helps in the acceptance of the wearing. The cat has to understand that there is a reward in store for its cooperation.

4. Never drag your cat.

5. Get to know your cat before you to walk it on a leash..

6. The first time you take your cat outside, carry it to a quiet, safe spot in your yard, and gently set it down. Always pick your cat up if another animal comes into your yard.

7. Be aware that your cat will be exposed to some dangers and parasites outdoors.

8. If you have an older cat, you'll still be able to train them to walk on a leash, but it may take a little longer.

9. If you want to take your cat out especially if you are in an unfamiliar location, put it in a harness with a leash to keep it safe.

10. Be sure to attach an ID tag and write your phone number on the harness so someone knows who to call if your cat happens to get loose.

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Saturday, November 3, 2018

Diabetes In Cats - A Complex Disease


The American Society for the  Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)  says, Diabetes in cats is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. After a cat eats, their digestive system breaks food into various components, including glucose which is carried into their cells by insulin.

While diabetes mellitus can affect any cat, it most often occurs in older, obese cats. Male cats are more likely to have diabetes than females. The exact cause of the disease in cats is not known, although obesity, is the major predisposing condition, and may cause chronic pancreatitis.

If left untreated, diabetes will shorten a cat's life. A dangerous, sometimes fatal condition called ketoacidosis may develop, indicated by some of the following symptoms: loss of appetite, diarrhea, vomiting, lethargy, weakness, dehydration, and breathing abnormalities. Diabetes can lead to a secondary bacterial infection, or a diabetes related disorder called diabetic neuropathy  that may cause cats to become progressively weaker, impairing their ability to jump.

There are three types of diabetes seen in cats:

Type I diabetes
These cats are insulin dependent, and need to receive daily insulin injections.

Type II diabetes
The cat’s pancreas may make enough insulin but the cat’s body does not use it properly. This is the most common type of feline diabetes.

The third type is known as Transient Diabetes. These are type II cats who present as diabetics and require insulin initially, but over time, their system re-regulates so they can go off insulin-especially with a change of diet.



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Saturday, October 20, 2018

Are Your Pets Protected From Fire/Carbon Monoxide When You Are Away From Home?


I recently heard a story of where a family and their pets died from carbon monoxide poisoning, which has prompted me to write this story.

As you go about your daily life, have you ever thought what would happened if a fire broke out in your home or apartment while you were away? And your beloved pet is home alone. While I am sure most of you reading this have protection for your family and pets…there are some that don’t.

Not everyone can afford or choose to have the paid emergency system linked to the fire department. However, you can install the wireless smoke/carbon monoxide detectors. Did you know that some fire departments will come to you home and install them for free? You can call your local fire department to see if they offer this free service.

The advantage of having a smoke/carbon monoxide detector is that maybe a neighbor,or someone passing by will hear it when it goes off, and can get help to your home or apartment.

There are all types of smoke/carbon monoxide detectors, in several price ranges. May I suggest the Pet Emergency Stickers for your doors in the event of an emergency at your home or apartment while you are away, this will notify emergency responders of any pets that you have inside. This will prompt them to look for your pet and know what type of animal they are looking for.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says, Carbon monoxide, or CO, is an odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death.

Remember to change the batteries in your alarms!





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Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Do Cats Get Rickets?...Yes, They Do


Rickets is a vitamin D deficiency or otherwise known as calcium, it's rare for cats to get it, but they do. If the kitten has bowed legs that could be a sign. The only thing a vet will do is change the cats diet and possibly add a vitamin supplement, but since cats only need a small amount of vitamin D, it will be small doses. It could have been caused by not the right nutrition, or simply a defect in the cats gene coding.

Few people imagine that such a thing as rickets exists among kittens, just the same as with growing children, resulting in deformed spines and crooked legs. This is caused by improper feeding on foods which are not bone forming.

The first symptoms are lameness when jumping, and in bad cases the kittens become unable to walk at all, and cry when the spine is touched near the tail.

If steps are not taken immediately to effect a cure, the cat has to be destroyed or the spine becomes shortened and a lump forms near the tail on the back, the legs become bowed and enlarged at the joints.

Excessive milk and cereal feeding can cause rickets, as the animal becomes too fat and the legs are not strong enough to carry the weight. Very lean meat, free from fat and gristle, with no other diet, will also result in rickets. Kittens bred from old cats are very subject to this disease, and need more than an ordinary diet.

To learn more about rickets, please read: Disorders Associated with Calcium, Phosphorus, and Vitamin D in Cats


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Saturday, August 18, 2018

Foods You Should Never Give Your Cat


Do you know that you should not give your cat milk every day? According to the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) most cats like milk, but do not need it if properly nourished. Also, many will get diarrhea if they drink too much milk. If it is given at all, the amount should be small and infrequent.

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) says, unless they are spoiled or moldy, milk, cheese and other dairy foods are not considered to be poisonous to pets. However, cats do not possess significant amounts of lactase, the enzyme that breaks down lactose in milk. Feeding milk and milk-based products to cats can actually cause them to vomit or have diarrhea, which in severe cases could lead to inflammation of the pancreas. For this reason, it’s always a good idea to check with your veterinarian before offering any “people food” to your pets.


Listed below are some of the foods that you should never give your cat:


Bones from Fish or Poultry - Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system


Canned Tuna (for human consumption) - Large amounts can cause malnutrition, since it lacks proper levels of vitamins and minerals. It can also lead to thiamine deficiency in cats.


Chocolate and Cocoa contain a chemical called theobromide  that can adversely affect the heart, lungs, kidney and central nervous system.


Citrus oil extracts - Can cause vomiting. Cats are more sensitive than dogs.


Dog Food - If accidental ingestion, will not cause a problem; if fed repeatedly, may result in malnutrition and diseases affecting the heart.


Fat Trimmings - Can cause pancreatitis.


Fish (Raw, Canned or Cooked) - If fed exclusively or in high amounts can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death.


Milk and Other Dairy Products  - Some adult cats and dogs may develop diarrhea if given large amounts of dairy products.


Mushrooms - Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.


Onions and Garlic (raw, cooked, or powder) - Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. Garlic is less toxic than onions.


Persimmons - Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.


Raw Eggs - Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.


Rhubarb Leaves - Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems.


Salt - If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.


String - Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."


Table Scraps (in large amounts) - Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; bones should not be fed.


Sugary Foods - Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.


Yeast Dough - Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.


Macadamia Nuts - Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.


Human Vitamin Supplements Containing Iron - Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.


Grapes, Raisins and Currants - Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys.


Baby Food - Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to cats .


Alcoholic Beverages - Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.


Poison Control Hotline

888-232-8870  (TOLL FREE)

For anyone who may not know, the poison control number charges you $35. This goes to pay the vet in case of a phone consultation. If you ever have to call, make sure to have credit card ready.



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Monday, November 13, 2017

Foods You Should Never Give Your Cat


Do you know that you should not give your cat milk every day? According to the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) most cats like milk, but do not need it if properly nourished. Also, many will get diarrhea if they drink too much milk. If it is given at all, the amount should be small and infrequent.

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) says, unless they are spoiled or moldy, milk, cheese and other dairy foods are not considered to be poisonous to pets. However, cats do not possess significant amounts of lactase, the enzyme that breaks down lactose in milk. Feeding milk and milk-based products to cats can actually cause them to vomit or have diarrhea, which in severe cases could lead to inflammation of the pancreas. For this reason, it’s always a good idea to check with your veterinarian before offering any “people food” to your pets.

Listed below are some of the foods that you should never give your cat:

Bones from Fish or Poultry - Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system

Canned Tuna (for human consumption) - Large amounts can cause malnutrition, since it lacks proper levels of vitamins and minerals. It can also lead to thiamine deficiency in cats.

Chocolate and Cocoa contain a chemical called theobromide  that can adversely affect the heart, lungs, kidney and central nervous system.

Citrus oil extracts - Can cause vomiting. Cats are more sensitive than dogs.

Dog Food - If accidental ingestion, will not cause a problem; if fed repeatedly, may result in malnutrition and diseases affecting the heart.

Fat Trimmings - Can cause pancreatitis.

Fish (Raw, Canned or Cooked) - If fed exclusively or in high amounts can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death.

Milk and Other Dairy Products  - Some adult cats and dogs may develop diarrhea if given large amounts of dairy products.

Mushrooms - Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.

Onions and Garlic (raw, cooked, or powder) - Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. Garlic is less toxic than onions.

Persimmons - Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.

Raw Eggs - Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.

Rhubarb Leaves - Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems.

Salt - If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.

String - Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."

Table Scraps (in large amounts) - Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; bones should not be fed.

Sugary Foods - Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.

Yeast Dough - Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.

Macadamia Nuts - Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.

Human Vitamin Supplements Containing Iron - Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.

Grapes, Raisins and Currants - Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys.

Baby Food - Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to cats .

Alcoholic Beverages - Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.

Poison Control Hotline
888-232-8870  (TOLL FREE)

For anyone who may not know, the poison control number charges you $35. This goes to pay the vet in case of a phone consultation. If you ever have to call, make sure to have credit card ready.


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Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Pet Disaster Preparedness


Red cross logo
Our pets enrich our lives in more ways than we can count. They are members of the family. In turn, they depend on us for their safety and wellbeing. The best way to ensure the safety of your entire family is to be prepared with a disaster plan. If you are a pet owner, that plan includes your pets. Being prepared can help save lives.
Emergency action plans for your family should include your animals

For information on disaster planning and emergency actions to take for livestock, horses, birds, reptiles or other small animals, such as gerbils or hamsters, please visit the Humane Society of the United States www.HSUS.org or Ready.gov.

Learn First Aid for Your Pets

Just like any other family member, pets deserve to be cared for and protected. That’s why the American Red Cross has developed Dog First Aid and Cat First Aid, comprehensive guides to help keep pets healthy and safe. From basic responsibilities, like spaying/neutering and giving medications, to managing cardiac emergencies and preparing for disasters, these guides offer information pet owners can trust.

Check out the Red Cross Store for pet first aid products or take a Pet First Aid class.

Create a pet disaster plan in case of an evacuation

If it is not safe for you to stay, it is not safe for them either.
  • Know which hotels and motels along your evacuation route will accept you and your pets in an emergency. Call ahead for reservations if you know you may need to evacuate. Ask if no pet policies could be waived in an emergency
  • Most American Red Cross shelters cannot accept pets because of health and safety concerns and other considerations. Service animals that assist people with disabilities are allowed in Red Cross shelters.
  • Know which friends, relatives, boarding facilities, animal shelters or veterinarians can care for your animals in an emergency. Prepare a list with phone numbers.
  • Although your animals may be more comfortable together, be prepared to house them separately.
  • Include your pets in evacuation drills so that they become used to entering and traveling in their carriers calmly.
  • Make sure that your pet’s vaccinations are current and that all dogs and cats are wearing collars with securely fastened, up-to-date identification. Many pet shelters require proof of current vaccinations to reduce the spread of disease.
  • Consider having your pet “microchipped” by your veterinarian.

Assemble a portable kit with emergency supplies for your pets

Keep items in an accessible place and store them in sturdy containers so that they can be carried easily.

Your kit should include:
  • Sturdy leashes, harnesses and/or carriers to transport pets safely and ensure that they can’t escape.
  • Food, drinking water, bowls, cat litter/pan and a manual can opener.
  • Medications and copies of medical records stored in a waterproof container.
  • A first aid kit.
  • Current photos of you with your pet(s) in case they get lost. Since many pets look alike, this will help to eliminate mistaken identity and confusion.
  • Information on feeding schedules, medical conditions, behavior problems, and the name and number of your veterinarian in case you have to foster or board your pets.
  • Pet beds and toys, if easily transportable.
Know what to do as the disaster approaches
  • Often, warnings are issued hours, even days, in advance. At the first hint of disaster, act to protect your pet.
  • Call ahead to confirm emergency shelter arrangements for you and your pets.
  • Ensure that all pets are wearing collars with securely fastened, up-to-date identification.
  • Check that your pet disaster supplies are ready to take at a moment's notice.
  • Bring pets inside so you won’t have to search for them if you need to leave quickly.

Helping Pets Recover after a Disaster
Your pet’s behavior may change dramatically after a disaster, becoming aggressive or defensive. Be aware of their well being and protect them from hazards to ensure the safety of other people and animals.
  • Watch your animals closely and keep them under your direct control as fences and gates may have been damaged.
  • Pets may become disoriented, particularly if the disaster has affected scent markers that normally allow them to find their home.
  • Be aware of hazards at nose and paw or hoof level, particularly debris, spilled chemicals, fertilizers and other substances that might not seem to be dangerous to humans.
  • Consult your veterinarian if any behavior problems persist.


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Thursday, February 26, 2015

The Benefits of Spaying or Neutering Your Cat


Picture of cat
All cats and kittens should be either spayed or neutered unless the owner is in the business of raising purebred cats. The days of letting the family cat have a litter of kittens so that kids could observe the miracle of birth are long gone. Animal rescue groups have done an excellent job communicating the tragedy of homeless pets. Most people now realize that stray and feral cat overpopulation is an enormous problem.

According to 2008 stats from the Humane Society, there are approximately 88 million owned pet cats in the United States (more than dogs!). Nearly one third of all US households own a cat and on average most of those homes have two cats. Eighty seven percent of the pet cats in the U.S. are spayed or neutered. It's a very common procedure and there are many benefits.

What Is Spaying And Neutering?
Sterilizing a cat is known as neutering for males and spaying for females. Neutering a male cat is a fairly simple procedure performed by a professional veterinarian. The cat is placed under general anesthesia, and the testes are removed through an incision in the scrotum. The incision is very small and stitches are usually not even necessary.

Spaying a female cat is a more involved and invasive procedure, and as such is often more expensive. The ovaries, fallopian tubes and uterus are removed after the cat is immobilized with general anesthesia. The operation is known as an ovario-hysterectomy. The abdominal area is shaved and the surgical wound usually only requires a few stitches.

Kittens should be spayed or neutered when they reach sexual maturity, which is usually between four and six months of age. However a cat can be safely spayed or neutered at any age, so even older adopted cats should have this procedure.

Some rescue organizations participate in a "catch and release" program where homeless cats are captured, neutered or spayed and released. This is considered more humane than euthanizing strays. The catch and release program is sometimes known as TNR (Trap-Neuter-Return) and the cats that are sterilized have part of one ear clipped. If you adopt a cat with a clipped ear, he or she has almost certainly been already spayed or neutered as a result of this effort.

Why Spay Or Neuter Your Cat?
There are many benefits to spaying or neutering your cat, and they extend to your pet, your family, your home and society in general.

Stray and feral cat overpopulation is a massive problem. The life of a homeless cat can be miserable and harsh. Feral cats also contribute to the destruction of other indigenous wildlife, especially birds.

Un-spayed female cats may be restless and noisy and exhibit other behavior problems.

Males who are not neutered (also known as Tom Cats) have many behavior problems, including a tendency to roam if allowed outside and a habit of spraying strong smelling urine inside the house to mark their territory.

Spayed and neutered cats generally have fewer health problems and a longer life expectancy.
Is there a downside to sterilizing your pet cat? Not really. Sometimes neutered males require slightly less food after the procedure so they don't gain weight. But most cats are healthier, happier and calmer if they've been spayed or neutered.

Fast Facts On Cat Sterilization
Most animal shelters and rescue groups require cats to be spayed or neutered before they will allow them to be adopted. The new owner should anticipate picking up the cost for this procedure.

The cost of spaying or neutering varies widely depending on the U.S. location, but will range from a low of $50 through a pet shelter to a high of $200 for a private veterinarian in a large urban area.

In most cases your cat will be able to come home the same day, especially if they are scheduled to be spayed or neutered in the morning.

For nervous cat owners who worry excessively about their beloved kitty, most vets are happy to call you after the procedure is over to let you know how your pet is doing.

Millions of beautiful cats and kittens are exterminated each year by animal shelters who can't find enough homes for them. The famous artist Leonardo da Vinci once said "even the smallest feline is a masterpiece." Cat owners can help make sure that each precious fur covered work of art has a happy home. The best way to accomplish this goal is through responsible spaying and neutering. FOLLOW US!
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Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Unlike Dogs, Are Not Small Furry Humans And Do Not Like To Be Petted


“Being held or stroked for too long can be very stressful for some cats,” Cats Protection behavior manager Nicky Trevorrow said. "Space and peace is often what they need. They are not small furry humans."

Those results echoed findings published last year by British researchers that found that cats in homes with multiple felines will often arrange their behavior so as to avoid each other.

However, that study also suggested that cats who live in multi-cat homes are probably more tolerant of petting.

Also, if you die alone in your house, your cat might eat you.

Just get a dog already.

Not convinced? Here a few more reasons why your cat is evil.

More >>>




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Thursday, March 20, 2014

Do You Know These Cat Facts and Myths?


Cats have fascinated humans ever since the day, probably about four thousand years ago, the first domestic cat made himself at home on the hearth by the fire. From ancient times to our modern age, myths and superstitions have surrounded cats. The ancient Egyptians worshiped them as gods, but people in later centuries feared them as harbingers of witchcraft and evil.

In today's high-tech world, we may think we've outgrown such fables. Yet a surprising number of modern-day myths about cats persist.

Did you know that the following are feline fables, not facts?

Cats are "No-Maintenance" Pets:
Because cats are litter-trained, some people think that simply giving their cat food and water is enough. Not so. Cats also need regular veterinary care and, just as important, lots of love and attention.

Cats Always Land on Their Feet:
While cats can often land on their feet after a short fall, falling from heights is another story. Upper-level windows and porches, unless securely screened, should be off-limits to cats, particularly in high-rise buildings.

Cats Can't be Trained:
Cats will, of course, do things their way if left to their own devices. But most cats can be taught to obey simple rules like not scratching the couch, eating plants, or jumping up on the kitchen counter. Repeated, gentle, and consistent training gets results. Also, if a cat understands the rules and has an approved outlet for her scratching impulses, such as a sturdy scratching post, there will be no need to have her declawed, a painful and unnecessary operation.

Cat's Aren't Happy Unless They Can Go Outside to Roam and Hunt:
Cats like to play, prowl, and pounce, and they can do all those activities indoors with you and a few toys -- without being exposed to predators, disease, traps, poison, and traffic.

Cats Become Fat and Lazy After They are Spayed\Neutered:
Cats, just like people, generally become fat because they eat too much and don't get enough exercise. The fact is, cats who are spayed or neutered live longer lives and make better companions. And they don't contribute to the pet-overpopulation problem in this country, where millions of unwanted cats and dogs are destroyed every year. There's no need to wait until a female cat has had a litter to have her spayed; it can be done before her first heat cycle.

Cats Can See in the Dark:
Cats cannot see in total darkness any better than a person can. They can see better than other animals in semidarkness, however, because of their eyes' anatomy.

Cats Don't Need to Wear a Collar and Tags:
An identification tag is a lost cat's ticket home. Every cat, even an indoor cat, should wear a collar with an ID tag to help him come home if he is lost.  Many cat owners believe a collar can injure a cat. But a breakaway collar lets a cat escape if the collar becomes snagged.

Cats Who Disappear for a Couple of Days Are Just Out Hunting; There's No Need to Worry:
The prolonged disappearance of any pet is cause for alarm. Cats are no exception, and as domestic animals, they cannot cope with the dangers posed by the outdoors. For their own safety and well-being, cats should always be kept indoors, but if your cat does somehow become lost, he needs to be looked for immediately -- before it's too late.

Cats Will Suck the Breath from Sleeping Infants:
Curious by nature, a cat may want to climb into the crib to see what new manner of squalling creature her family has brought home. But she won't suck the baby's breath. She may feel a little jealous, however, so introductions should be gradual. Lots of lavish attention will also help reassure her that she's still an important member of the family. Cats can suffer from sibling rivalry, too!

Cats Are Aloof, Independent Animals and Don't Really Want a Lot of Attention from Humans:
Cats are domestic animals because they live in the home. They crave human companionship and establish loving bonds with their human families. They may not always show it, but that's just the feline way. If you toss the cat outdoors, or spend little time with him, you'll never know the rewarding -- and very special -- relationship that comes from making a cat a true member of the family.

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Thursday, October 31, 2013

Meet Scott Giacoppo from the Washington Humane Society - Find Out What this Life Long Cat Advocate Has Seen in the Way of Changes for Cats!



Meet Scott Giacoppo from the Washington Humane Society in D.C. and find out what this life long cat advocate has seen in the way of changes for cats in shelters, adoption programs, community cat programs, feral cat, trap, neuter, vaccinate, return programs, fostering cats and kittens, and even the challenges involved in mountain lion sightings around our nation’s capitol.

Check out the Washington Humane Society


Watch or listen to previous episodes of the Cat Chat Show




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Friday, June 17, 2011

Do You Know The Difference Between A Feral And Domesticated Cat?


Do you know the difference between a  feral and domestic cat? You probably have seen a feral cat, and just thought it was a stray cat.

Feral Cats:
Life-span: 2-3 years

Feral cats are descended from domestic cats, but are born and live without human contact. These are the ones you see running through your backyard. Sometimes you can hear them fighting and making a crying sound like a baby.

Feral cats are homeless cats, some consider them as wild animals.  They are often confused with pets who were abandoned or have become lost.

The moms usually give birth in quiet, unseen spots where the kittens will not be visible for several weeks.  They will hide during the day and come out at night. Since there is no human contact, they will be totally wild. When the kittens begin to romp and play, they are usually noticed by humans, but are not easily captured.

They are usually terrified of humans, and a feral kitten may hiss and "spit" at humans.
The feral kitten is capable of giving you a nasty scratch or bite and will probably try to escape if given the chance. To the kitten you may be seen as a predator; the kitten may think it is fighting for its life.

Feral diet: small mammals (rabbits, mice), birds and carrion.

Domesticated Cat:


Life-span: 15 years

A domestic cat, or house cat is a small furry domesticated carnivorous mammal that is valued by humans for its companionship.

A stray cat is one that has possibly become separated from it's owner. It may have become lost, dumped, or even abandoned when the owner moved or died. These are cats that are used to people, and tend to be somewhat  approachable.

Sometimes stray cats will have on collars with tags indicating that the are a pet.

Domestic Cat Diet:

Dry foods are  very helpful with matters of oral hygiene. Dry food, unlike moist, requires chewing and gnawing of kibble to be swallowed.

Typically, moist food is higher in fat and calories, and therefore more palatable. Many cats that are ill or debilitated will eat moist food because of its taste and ease of digestion.

Failure to control the breeding of pet cats by spaying and neutering and the abandonment of former household pets has resulted in large numbers of feral cats worldwide, with a population of up to 60 million of these animals in the United States alone.




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Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Have You Ever Adopted An Animal from a Shelter?


Have you ever adopted an animal from a shelter? If so, we would like to hear your story. Please include what type of pet, the pet's name and how long you have them. Let us know how your pet has changed your life and anything about them!






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Emergency Preparedness For Your Pet – Do You Know What To Do In A Disaster?


Are your prepared? Do you know what to do with your pet in a disaster? In the world that we live in, we are constantly reminded to be prepared for emergencies.  Have you ever thought, what would happen to your pet in a disaster?

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), says to arrange a safe haven for your pets in the event of evacuation. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND. Remember, if it isn't safe for you, it isn't safe for your pets. They may become trapped or escape and be exposed to numerous life-threatening hazards. Note that not all Red Cross disaster shelters accept pets, so it is imperative that you have determined where you will bring your pets ahead of time.

The Federal Management  Agency (FEMA), says to take pet food, bottled water, medications, veterinary records, cat litter/pan, can opener, food dishes, first aid kit and other supplies with you in case they're not available later. Consider packing a "pet survival" kit  (Please take a look at the slideshow on the left showing these items), which could be easily deployed if disaster hits. Also, separate dogs and cats. Even if your dogs and cats normally get along, the anxiety of an emergency situation can cause pets to act irrationally. Keep small pets away from cats and dogs.

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If You Have A Pet, You Will Need A Veterinarian – List Of Veterinarians In The Washington, DC Area


If you have a pet(s) and live, or are planning to move to the Washington, DC area, you will need a Veterinarian.  Below is a list of Veterinarians in Washington, DC, Maryland and Virginia area.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Adams Morgan Animal Clinic
2112 Eighteenth Street, NW
Washington, DC
(202) 638-7470

Animal Clinic of Anacostia
2210 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, SE
Washington, DC
(202) 889-8900

Animal Clinic of Capitol Hill
1240 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE
Washington, DC
(202) 543-2288

City Paws Animal Hospital
1823 14th Street NW
Washington, DC
(202) 232-PAWS (7297)

Collins Veterinary Hospital
1808 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Washington, DC
(202) 659-8830

Dupont Veterinary Clinic
2022 P Street, NW
Washington, DC
(202) 466-2211

Friendship Hospital for Animals
(open 24 hours for emergencies)
4105 Brandywine Street, NW
Washington, DC
(202) 363-7300

Georgetown Veterinary Hospital
2916 M Street, NW
Washington, DC
(202) 333-2140

Janes Veterinary Clinic
520 8th Street, SE
Washington, DC
(202) 543-6699

Kindcare Animal Hospital
3622 12th Street, NE
Washington, DC
(202) 635-3622

MacArthur Animal Hospital
4832 MacArthur Boulevard, NW
Washington, DC
(202) 337-0120

Sol Perl, D.V.M.
Housecalls for Pets (upper NW Washington)
(301) 774-5656

Petworth Animal Hospital (specializes in sterilization - handles feral (wild) cats)
4012 Georgia Avenue, NW
Washington, DC
(202) 723-7142

Ross Veterinary Hospital
5138 MacArthur Boulevard, NW
Washington, DC
(202) 363-1316

Southeast Animal Hospital
2309 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE
Washington, DC
(202) 584-2125

MARYLAND

Al-Lynn Animal Hospital
6904 Allentown Road
Camp Springs, MD
(301) 449-8822

Alpine Veterinary Hospital
7732 MacArthur Boulevard
Cabin John, MD
(301) 229-2400

Animal Allergy and Dermatology Clinic
9039 Gaither Road
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 977-9169

Animal Clinic of North Bowie
6796 Laurel Bowie Road
Bowie, MD
(301) 464-3611

Animal Medical Hospital of Belair Road
7688 Belair Road
Baltimore, MD
(410) 661-9200

Animal Medical Center of Watkins Park
60 Watkins Park Drive
Upper Marlboro, MD
(301) 249-3030

Animal Medical Hospital at Glenwood, Inc.
Inwood Village Center
2465 Route 97, Suite 7
Glenwood, MD
(410) 489-9677

Animal Skin Disease Clinic
(practice limited to skin disease and allergies)
582 Hubbard Drive
Rockville, MD
(301) 468-7028

Annapolis Cat Hospital
2248 Bay Ridge Avenue
Annapolis, MD
(410) 268-2287

Anne Arundel Veterinary Emergency Clinic
808 Bestgate Road
Annapolis, MD
(410) 224-0331

Avian House Calls
11854 Linden Chapel Road
Clarksville, MD
(410) 531-9213

Banfield Pet Hospital
20924 Frederick Avenue
Germantown, MD
(301) 540-6251

BCA Bowie Animal Hospital
6840 Race Track Road
Bowie, MD
(301) 262-8590

Belair Veterinary Hospital
15511 Hall Road
Bowie, MD
(301) 249-5200

Best Friend's Veterinary Hospital
5100 Muncaster Mill Road
Rockville, MD
(301) 977-1881

Bowie Towne Veterinary Hospital
13801 Annapolis Road
Bowie, MD
(301) 464-0402

Bradley Hills Animal Hospital
7210 Bradley Boulevard
Bethesda, MD
(301) 365-5448

Brentwood Animal Hospital
3900 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD
(301) 864-3164

Briggs Chaney Animal Hospital
13850 Old Columbia Pike
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 989-2226

Brookeville Animal Hospital
22201 Georgia Avenue
Brookville, MD
(301) 774-9698

Buckeystown Veterinary Clinic
3820 Buckeystown Pike
Frederick, MD
(301) 698-9930

Burtonsville Animal Hospital
15543 Old Columbia Pike
Burtonsville, MD
(301) 421-9200

Cameron's Temple Hills Animal Hospital
4900 St. Barnabas Road
Temple Hills, MD
(301) 894-2576

Canal Clinic
9125 River Road
Potomac, MD
(301) 299-0880
13507 Clopper Road
Germantown, MD
(301) 540-7770

A Cat Practice
2816 Linden Lane
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 587-0052

Chevy Chase Veterinary Clinic
8815 Connecticut Avenue
Chevy Chase, MD
(301) 656-6655

Clovery Animal Clinic
15549 New Hampshire Avenue
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 384-4162

College Park Animal Hospital
9717 Baltimore Avenue
College Park, MD
(301) 441-2547

Columbia Animal Hospital
10788 Hickory Ridge Road
Columbia, MD
(410) 730-2122
(443) 413-9031

Coolridge Animal Hospital
6801 Old Branch Avenue
Camp Springs, MD
(301) 449-1610

Crofton Vet Center
2151 Defense Highway
Crofton, MD
(410) 721-7387

Currey Animal Clinic
5439 Butler Road
Bethesda, MD
(301) 654-3000

Damascus Veterinary Hospital
24939 Ridge Road
Damascus, MD
(301) 253-2072

Del Ray Animal Hospital
9301 Old Georgetown Road
Bethesda, MD
(301) 564-1923

Diamond Veterinary Hospital
17000 Long Draft Road
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 869-3990

Emergency Animal Center
1896 Urbana Pike #23
(entrance in rear of shopping center)
Hyattstown, MD
(301) 831-1088

Fairland Animal Hospital
12711 Old Columbia Pike
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 622-2115

Falls Road Veterinary Hospital
10229 Falls Road
Potomac, MD
(301) 983-8400

Fallston Veterinary Clinic
2615 Belair Road
Fallston, MD
(410) 877-1727

Feathers, Scales & Tails Veterinary Hospital
330 One Forty Village Road
Fairground Village
Westminster, MD
(410) 876-0244

Flower Valley Veterinary Clinic
4201 Norbeck Road
Rockville, MD
(301) 929-1600

Forestville Animal Hospital
7307 Marlboro Pike
Forestville, MD
(301) 736-5288

Ft. Meade Veterinary Treatment Facility
Rt. 175 & 20th Street
Ft. Meade, MD
(301)677-1300

Four County Animal Hospital
26528-A Ridge Road
Damascus, MD
(301) 253-6144

Fox Chapel Veterinary Hospital
19749 N. Frederick Road
Germantown, MD
(301) 540-8387

Fox Hall Veterinary Clinic
13200 Georgia Avenue
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 933-6033

Gaithersburg Animal Hospital
280 N. Frederick Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 948-2828

Gaithersburg Square Veterinary Clinic
582 N. Frederick Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 840-9477

Germantown Veterinary Clinic
19911 Father Hurley Boulevard
Germantown, MD
(301) 972-9730

Glen Mill Veterinary Practice
12900 Glenn Mill Road
Potomac, MD
(301) 762-7387

Glenn Dale Veterinary Clinic
10843 Lanham Severn Road
Glendale, MD
(301) 390-2325

Glenvilah Veterinary Clinic
12948-E Travilah Road
Potomac, MD
(301) 963-4664

Goshen Animal Clinic
8357 Snouffers School Road
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 977-5586

Greater Annapolis Veterinary Hospital
1901 Generals Highway
Annapolis, MD
(410) 224-3800

Grove Center Veterinary Hospital
9033 Gaither Road
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 963-0400

Hampden Lane Veterinary Office
4921 Hampden Lane
Bethesda, MD
(301) 951-0300

Healthy Pet Mobile Vet
(offers house calls)
301-305-3722

Highway Veterinary Hospital
2604 Crain Highway
Bowie, MD
(301) 249-2005

Hoffman Animal Hospital
15 Old Mill Bottom Road North
Annapolis, MD
(410) 757-3566

Holistic Pets and People
(Offers acupuncture, healing touch, flower essences, etc. Treats horses, rabbits, ferrets, birds, and reptiles, as well as cats and dogs.)
(301) 221-3412

House Paws In-Home Veterinary Care
(parts of Maryland; please check website for specific areas)
703-264-7879

Huffard Animal Hospital
8073 Ritchie Highway
Pasadena, MD
(410) 768-3620

Hunt Valley Animal Hospital
11206 York Road
Hunt Valley, MD
(410) 527-0800

Hyattsville Animal Hospital
4567 Rhode Island Avenue
Hyattsville, MD
(301) 864-2325

Kentlands Veterinary Hospital
117 Booth Street
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 519-7944

Kenwood Animal Hospital
5439 Butler Road
Bethesda, MD
(301)-654-3000

Kindness Animal Hospital
2130 University Boulevard
Wheaton, MD
(301) 949-2511

Kingsbrook Animal Hospital
5322 New Design Road
Frederick, MD
(301) 631-6900

Lakeside Veterinary Center
14709 Baltimore Avenue
Laurel, MD
(301) 498-8387

Largo Veterinary Hospital
10658 Campus Way South
Largo, MD
(301) 350-4777

Little Seneca Animal Hospital
13009 Wisteria Drive
Germantown, MD
(301) 540-8670

Lutherville Animal Hospital
506 West Seminary Avenue
Lutherville, MD
(410) 296-7387

Lynn Animal Hospital
6215 Baltimore Avenue
Riverdale, Maryland
301-779-1184

Maple Springs Veterinary Hospital
14925 Dufief Mill Road
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 424-0373

Marymont Animal Hospital
24 Randolph Road
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 384-1223

Metropolitan Emergency Animal Hospital
12106 Nebel Street
Rockville, MD
(301) 770-5225

Middlebrook Veterinary Clinic
19530 Amaranth Drive
Germantown, MD
(301) 540-0590

Montgomery Animal Hospital
Montrose Road
Rockville, MD
(301) 881-6447

Montgomery Village Animal Hospital
19222 Montgomery Village Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 330-2200

Mt. Airy Animal Hospital
327 E. Ridgeville Boulevard
Mt. Airy, MD
(301) 829-4800
(410) 795-6926

Muddy Branch Veterinary Center
333 Muddy Branch Road
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 963-0275

Negola's Ark
9144 Rothbury Drive
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 216-0066

New Carrollton Veterinary Hospital
7601 Good Luck Road
Lanham, MD
(301) 552-3800

New Hampshire Avenue Animal Hospital
6701 New Hampshire Avenue
Takoma Park, MD
(301) 270-2050

Norbeck Animal Clinic
2645 Norbeck Road
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 924-3616

North Laurel Animal Hospital
Whisky Bottom Shopping Center
Laurel, MD
(301) 953-7387

Old Farm Veterinary Hospital
100 Tuscany Drive
Frederick, MD
301 846-9988

Olney-Sandy Spring Veterinary Hospital
1300 Olney-Sandy Spring Road
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 774-9500

Owings Mills Animal and Bird Hospital
9623A Reisterstown Road
Owings Mills, Maryland
(410) 363-0393

Patuxent Valley Animal Hospital
Routes 29 and 216
North Laurel, MD
(301) 490-1030

Peach Tree Vet Clinic
18620 Darnestown Road
Beallsville, MD
(301) 972-7010

Sol Perl, D.V.M.
Housecalls for Pets (southern Montgomery County)
(301) 774-5656

Pet Dominion
15820 Redland Road
Rockville, MD
(301) 258-0333

Pet Hospice Care
(offers house calls)
Dr. JoAnne Carey

PetVacx Veterinary Services
14636 Rothgeb Drive
Rockville, MD
(301) 838-9506

Poolesville Veterinary Clinic
19621 Fisher Avenue
Poolesville, MD
(301) 972-7705

Prince Georges Animal Hospital
7440 Annapolis Road
Hyattsville, MD
(301) 577-9400

Quince Orchard Veterinary Hospital
11910 Darnestown Road
N. Potomac, MD
(301) 258-0850

Reichardt Animal Hospital
125 Mayo Road
Edgewater, MD
(410) 956-4500

Rocky Gorge Animal Hospital
7515 Brooklyn Bridge Road
Laurel, MD
(301) 776-7744

Roving Pet Vet, LLC
Small Animal Veterinary Housecall Practice
20 mile radius of Frederick, MD
(301) 305-1205

Seabrook Station Animal Hospital
9453 Lanhan Severn Road
Seabrook, MD
(301) 577-3666

Silver Spring Animal Hospital
1915 Seminary Road
Silver Spring, MD
(301) 587-6099

South Arundel Veterinary Hospital
85 West Central Avenue
Edgewater, MD
(410) 956-2932
(301) 261-4388

St. Charles Animal Hospital
3 Doolittle Drive
Waldorf, MD
(310) 645-2550

Takoma Park Animal Clinic
7330 Carroll Avenue
Takoma Park, MD
(301) 270-4700

Temple Hills Animal Hospital
4900 St. Barnabas Road
Temple Hills, MD
(301) 894-2576

Three Notch Veterinary Hospital
44215 Airport View Drive
Hollywood, MD
(301) 373-8633

Town and Country Animal Clinic
2715 Olney-Sandy Spring Road
Olney, MD
(301) 774-7111

Towson Veterinary Hospital
716 North York Road
Towson, MD
(410) 825-8880

Turkey Foot Veterinary Clinic
14426 Turkey Foot Road
North Potomac, MD
(301)921-8382

Valley Animal Hospital
9157 Reisterstown Road
Baltimore, MD
(410) 363-2040

VCA Bowie Animal Hospital
6840 Race Track Road
Bowie, MD
(301) 262-8590

VCA North Rockville Animal Hospital
1390 E. Gude Drive
Rockville, MD
(301) 340-9292

VCA Squire Animal Hospital
15222 Marlboro Pike
Upper Marlboro, MD
(301) 627-4664

VCA Veterinary Referral Associates, Inc.
15021 Dufief Mill Road
Gaithersburg, MD
(301) 340-3224

Veterinary Health Care Center
632 University Boulevard
E. Silver Spring, MD
(301) 445-0170

Veterinary Holistic Care
4280 Moorland Lane
Bethesda, MD
(301) 656-2882

Waugh Chapel Animal Hospital
2638 Brandermill Boulevard
Gambrills, MD
(410)451-3700

Wheaton Animal Hospital
2929 University Boulevard
Kensington, MD
(301) 949-1520

Woodfield Veterinary Clinic
25017 Woodfield Road
Damascus, MD
(301) 253-6808

VIRGINIA

Adams Mill Veterinary Hospital
10205 Colvin Run Road
Great Falls, VA
(703) 757-7570

Alexandria Animal Hospital
(staffed 24 hours for emergencies)
2660 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA
(703) 751-2022

All Pets Veterinary Hospital and Avian Medical Center in Chantilly Virginia
43112 John Mosby Higheay, Suite 102
Chantilly, VA
(703) 327-6666

Animal Clinic of Clifton
(offers house calls)
Clifton, VA
(703) 802-0490

Animal Clinic of Tall Oaks
12004 North Shore Drive
Reston, VA
(703) 437-5600

Animal Dental Clinic
410 W. Maple Avenue
Vienna, VA
(703) 281-5900

Animal Emergency Hospital and Referral Center
(staffed 24 hours for emergencies)
2 Cardinal Park Drive
Leesburg, VA
(703) 777-5755

Animal Medical Center of Cascades
20789 Algonkian Parkway
Sterling, VA
(571) 434-0250

Annandale Animal Hospital
7405 Little River Turnpike
Annandale, VA
(703) 941-3100

Arlington Animal Hospital
2624 Columbia Pike
Arlington VA
(703) 920-5300

Ashburn Farms Animal Hospital
43330 Juncion Plaza Boulevard #172
Ashburn, VA
(703) 726-8784

Ashburn Village Animal Hospital
44110 Ashburn Shopping Plaza #172
Ashburn, VA
(703) 729-0700

Austin Veterinary Clinic
7323 Little River Turnpike
Annandale, VA
(703) 941-5300

Ballston Animal Hospital
5232 Wilson Boulevard
Arlington, VA
(703) 528-2776

Banfield
3351 Jefferson Davis Highway
Alexandria, VA
703-518-8492

Banfield
46220 Potomac Run Plaza
Sterling, VA
703-406-9591

Banfield
6535 Frontier Drive
Springfield, VA
(703) 313-8429

Barcroft Cat Clinic
6357 Columbia Pike
Arlington, VA
(703) 941-2852

Beacon Hill Cat Hospital
6610 Richmond Highway
Alexandria, VA
(703) 765-2287

Belle Haven Animal Medical Center
1221 Belle Haven Road
Alexandria, VA
(703) 721-0080

Blue Cross Animal Hospital
8429 Lee Highway
Fairfax, VA
(703) 560-1881

Broad Run Veterinary Service
149 Spring Street
Herndon, VA
(703) 435-1911

Burke Forest Veterinary Clinic
6214 Rolling Road
Springfield, VA
(703) 569-8181

Burke Veterinary Clinic
6411 Shiplett Boulevard
Burke, VA
(703) 455-6222

Capital Cat Clinic
923 N. Kenmore Street
Arlington, VA
(703) 522 1995

Cat Hospital of Fairfax, Inc.
3915 Old Lee Highway, Suite 21B
Fairfax, VA
(703) 273-5454

Centreville Animal Hospital
13663 Lee Highway
Centreville, VA
(703) 830-1182

Centreville Square Animal Hospital
12415-L Centreville Square
Centreville, VA
(703) 222-9682

Chantilly Animal Hospital
13705 Lee-Jackson Memorial Highway
Chantilly, VA
(703) 802-8387

Cherrydale Veterinary Clinic
4038 Lee Highway
Arlington VA
(703) 528-9001

Clocktower Animal Hospital
2451 Centreville Road, #I-12
Herndon, VA
(703) 713-1200

Columbia Pike Animal Hospital
(Chiropractic services no longer available: Jana Froeling, DVM has moved; see Veterinary Holistic and Rehabilitation Center and Full Circle Equine Service in Amissville, VA (below)
4205 Evergreen Lane
Annandale, VA
(703) 256-8414

Commonwealth Animal Hospital
10860 Main Street
Fairfax, VA
(703) 273-8183

Colvin Run Veterinary Clinic
1203 Downey Drive
Vienna, VA
(703) 759-4500

Companion Animal Clinic
10998 Clara Barton Drive
Fairfax Station, VA
(703) 250-4100

Companion Animal Hospital
7297 Commerce Street
Springfield, VA
(703) 866-4100

Companion Paws Mobile Veterinary Service
(offers house calls)
serving Northern Virginia
(703) 450-6360

Crosspointe Animal Hospital
8975 Village Shops Drive
Fairfax Station, VA
(703) 690-6600

Crossroads Animal Care Center
12950 Troupe Street
Woodbridge, VA
(703) 497-PETS

Del Ray Animal Hospital
524 E. Mt. Ida Avenue
Alexandria, VA
(703) 739-0000

Dominion Animal Hospital
795 Station Street
Herndon, VA
(703) 437-6900

Dunn Loring Animal Hospital
2304 Gallows Road
Dunn Loring, VA
(703) 573-7464

Eastern Exotic Veterinary Center (part of Pender clinic)
4001 Legato Road
Fairfax, VA
(703) 654-3100

Elpaw
33 S. Pickett Street
Alexandria, VA
(703) 751-3707

Emergency Veterinary Clinic of Northern Virginia
see: The Hope Center for Advanced Veterinary Medicine in VA

Exotic Pet Clinic
7297 Commerce Street
Springfield, VA
(703) 451-2414

Fairfax Animal Hospital
5914 Seminary Road
Bailey's Crossroads, VA
(703) 820-2557

Fairfax Equine Service
(mobile clinic for horses)
(703) 849-8981

Falls Church Animal Hospital
1249 West Broad Street
Falls Church, VA
(703) 532-6121

Feline Veterinary Clinic (cats only)
7189 Lee Highway
Falls Church, VA
(703) 241-8480

Ft. Hunt Animal Hospital
1900 Elkins Street
Alexandria, VA
(703) 360-6100

Full Circle Equine Service (Dr. Jana Froeling offers chiropractic, acupuncture, and standard medical care)
Amissville, VA
(540) 937-1754

Georgetown Pike Veterinary Clinic
9891 Georgetown Pike
Great Falls, VA
(703) 759-4410

Great Falls Animal Hospital
10125 Colvin Run Road
Great Falls, VA
(703) 759-2330

Greenbriar Animal Hospital
13035-C Lee Jackson Highway
Fairfax, VA
(703) 378-8813

Hayfield Animal Hospital
7724 Telegraph Road
Alexandria, VA
(703) 971-2127

Herndon Animal Medical Center
720 Jackson Street
Herndon, VA
(703) 435-8777

Herndon-Reston Animal Hospital
500 Elden Street
Herndon, VA
(703) 437-5655

Hollin Hall Animal Hospital
7930 Ft Hunt Road
Alexandria, VA
(703) 660-0044

Holistic Veterinary Health, Inc.
(offers acupuncture and other holistic treatments)
12700 Chapel Road
Clifton, VA
(703) 449-9144

The Hope Center for Advanced Veterinary Medicine
(staffed 24 hours for emergencies)
140 Park Street SE (moved to this location)
Vienna, VA
(703) 281-5121

House Paws In-Home Veterinary Care
703-264-7879

Hunter Mill Animal Hospital
2935 Chain Bridge Road
Oakton, VA
(703) 281-1644

Hybla Valley Veterinary Hospital
7627 Richmond Highway
Alexandria, VA
(703) 965-9292

Jermantown Animal Hospital
4035 Jermantown Road
Fairfax, VA
(703) 273-5055

Kingstowne Cat Clinic
5830 Kingstowne Center Dr. Suite 120
Alexandria, VA
(703) 922-8228

Kingsview Animal Hospital
7434 Beulah Street
Alexandria, VA
(703) 971-9292

Little River Veterinary Clinic
4000 Burke Station Road
Fairfax, VA
(703) 273-5110

Maple Shade Animal Hospital
5597 Mapledale Plaza
Dale City, VA
(703) 670-7668

McLean Animal Hospital
1330 Old Chainbridge Road
McLean, VA
(703) 356-5000

Morganna Animal Clinic and Boarding Kennel
9050 Liberia Avenue
Manassas, VA
(703) 361-4196

Mt. Vernon Animal Hospital
8623 Richmond Highway
Alexandria, VA
(703) 360-6600

Northern Virginia Home Veterinary Services
Ronald J. Frank, DVM
(703) 938-1771

Northside Veterinary Clinic
4003 Lee Highway
Arlington, VA
(703) 525-7115

Oakton-Vienna Veterinary Hospital
(sees exotics and pocket pets, too)
320 Maple Avenue, East
Vienna, VA
(703) 938-2800

Old Dominion Animal Health Center
6719 Lowell Avenue
McLean, VA
(703) 356-5582

Old Town Veterinary Clinic
425 North Henry Street
Alexandria, VA
(703) 549-3647

Parkway Veterinary Clinic
5749 Burke Center Parkway
Burke, VA
(703) 323-9020

Paws to Heal Veterinary Clinic formerly called Veterinary holistic and Rehabilitation Center
(offers acupuncture, chiropractic and other holistic treatments)
360 Maple Avenue, West
Vienna, VA
(703) 938-2563

Pender Veterinary Clinic
4001 Legato Road
Fairfax, VA
(703) 591-3304

Pet Home Care
Dharm Singh, DVM
(703) 435-VETS

Reston Animal Hospital
2403 Reston Parkway
Reston, VA
(707) 620-2566

Ridge Lake Animal Hospital
1400 Old Bridge Road
Woodbridge, VA
(703) 690-4949

Sacramento Veterinary Hospital
8794-D Sacramento Drive
Alexandria, VA
(703) 780-2808

Saratoga Animal Hospital
8054 Rolling Road
Springfield, VA
(703) 455-1188

Seneca Hill Animal Hospital
11415 Georgetown Pike
Great Falls, VA
(703)450-6760

Seven Corners Animal Hospital and Five Paws Pet Resort
6300 Arlington Boulevard
Falls Church, VA
(703) 534-1156

SouthPaws Veterinary Referral Center
(staffed 24 hours for emergencies)
(offers ultrasound, radiology, neurosurgery, holistic medicine, intensive care, oncology, orthopedics)
8500 Arlington Boulevard (recently moved from Springfield)
Fairfax, VA
(703) 752-9100

Springfield Animal Hospital
6580 Backlick Road
Springfield, VA
(703) 451-1995

Springfield Emergency Veterinary Hospital
(staffed 24 hours for emergencies)
(specializes in dermatology, cardiology, intensive care, oncology, radiation oncology, CAT scan, radioiodine)
6651-F Backlick Road
Springfield, VA
(703) 451-8900

Sterling Park Animal Hospital
800 West Church Road
Sterling, VA
(703) 430-3000

Suburban Animal Hospital
6879 Lee Highway
Arlington, VA
(703) 532-4043

Town and Country Animal Hospital
9780 Lee Highway
Fairfax, VA
(703) 273-2110

University Animal Hospital
10681 Braddock Road
Fairfax, VA
(703) 385-1054

VCA-Barcroft Cat Hospital
6357 Columbia Pike
Bailey's Crossroads, VA
(703) 941-2852

VCA-Old Town Animal Hospital
425 N. Henry Street
Alexandria, VA
(703) 549-3647

Veterinary Holistic and Rehabilitation Center now called Paws to Heal Veterinary Clinic
(offers acupuncture, chiropractic and other holistic treatments)
360 Maple Avenue, West
Vienna, VA
(703) 938-2563

Veterinary House Call Service
2026 Golf Course Drive
Reston, VA
(703) 620-3919

Vienna Animal Hospital
531 Maple Avenue West
Vienna, VA
(703) 938-2121

Village Veterinary Clinic
9534 Burke Road
Burke, VA
(703) 978-8655

Westfields Animal Hospital
5095 Westfields Boulevard
Centreville, VA
(703) 378-3028

Woodbridge Animal Hospital
(staffed 24 hours for emergencies)
13312 Jefferson Davis Highway
Woodbridge, VA
(703) 494-5191

Iams Pet Imaging Center
328 Maple Avenue East
Vienna, VA
703-281-9440
(MRI's for pets)

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