The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : 13 Facts Most People Don't Know About The Coconut Crab, The Biggest Arthropod The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : 13 Facts Most People Don't Know About The Coconut Crab, The Biggest Arthropod

Saturday, September 8, 2018

13 Facts Most People Don't Know About The Coconut Crab, The Biggest Arthropod

Although most people don't think about crabs as bone crushing, kitten-eating, mastadons of the tropics, most people have never met this terrestrial hermit crab. About the size of a small dog, the coconut crab - otherwise known as the robber crab or palm thief - is the biggest arthropod in the world, often weighing up to nine pounds. These nightmare crabs look more like an alien from outer space than a species of Earth, and their look isn't the only crazy thing about them.

There are plenty of creepy coconut crab facts. These guys can use their four-foot long legs to scuttle quickly from place to place; burrow into dark holes in the ground; and even climb soaring coconut trees. Sometimes known to take down a small mammal, the coconut crab is a true marvel of nature and one that continues to frighten and titillate anyone nearby. But while some believe they are harmless beach combers, others have suspected them of much greater crimes. If you love crabs that are scary, look no further than the coconut crab.

Life is good for the coconut crab. Found on tropical islands around the Indian Ocean and parts of the Pacific, these terrestrial critters can live anywhere from 30 to 60 years. Their days consists of napping in shady corners, looking for shiny object, and of course, finding coconuts to eat, which is their favorite food. They are the world's largest arthropods, a phylum of joint-legged creatures that also includes spiders, crustaceans, and other insects. Although the Japanese spider crab is technically larger, it lives underwater where it's weight is supported.

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