The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : Why This Domestic Violence Center's Pet Shelter Is Crucial For Both Animals And People

Friday, May 22, 2015

Why This Domestic Violence Center's Pet Shelter Is Crucial For Both Animals And People

A 12-year-boy and his beloved cat have been reunited after a Phoenix domestic violence center opened a shelter for residents’ pets.

When Robert Pressler and his mother, Jennifer Pressler, arrived at the Sojourner Center two months ago, they didn’t want to leave their orange cat, Clark Kent, behind.

At the time, the center had been building a facility for pets for about a year and a half but did not yet have a place for Clark Kent to stay, Teri Hauser, chief advancement officer at the center, told The Huffington Post. Jennifer Pressler even considered leaving the center because the cat couldn't stay there.

“We were going to leave and I didn't have anywhere to go,” Pressler told local TV station Fox 10.

With funding assistance from pet rescue group RedRover, the Sojourner Center found temporary housing for the cat at local animal shelter Lost Our Home. (Since 2008, RedRover has helped Sojourner Center pay for temporary housing for residents' pets).

Nevertheless, being separated from his cat during such a traumatic time was “devastating” for Robert, Hauser said, and the boy began helping with the construction of the onsite pet facility any way he could.

"He’d come in every day," Hauser said. "He was very much a participant in helping the guys do what they felt was safe for him."

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