The Pet Tree House - Where Pets Are Family Too : 9 Foods You Should Never Feed Your Pet

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

9 Foods You Should Never Feed Your Pet

Is it okay to toss your pet a grape? How about the skin you just pulled off your baked chicken? We know it’s hard to resist those big eyes and wagging tongue, but beware: The very thing your pet’s dying to eat may just do more harm than good.

Here, Dr. Samantha Klau, veterinarian for the doggy-care center Biscuits & Bath, shares 9 types of food that are bad for your dog or cat.

Onions and garlic
Whether fresh, cooked, dried or powdered, these veggies cause damage to red blood cells and gastrointestinal problems in pets. "The small amounts found in dog food and supplements usually don't cause a problem, but we recommend not giving it to your pet," Klau said.

Signs that you should call your vet: weakness, shortness of breath, loss of appetite or vomiting

Alcohol
Make sure you keep alcohol far away from your pets, advises Klau. Beer, liquor or wine damages your pet’s liver, brain and can cause diarrhea, disorientation, dehydration and put your pet in a comatose state if not treated quickly.

Signs that you should call your vet: vomiting, diarrhea, loss of coordination, disorientation, stupor and, in severe cases, coma, seizures or the inability to stand up.

Caffeine
If consumed in large enough quantities, anything caffeinated can kill your pet. That includes coffee (even the grounds), tea, energy drinks and medications.

Signs that you should call your vet: rapid heartbeat, muscle tremors, bleeding, restlessness, rapid breathing or seizure-like symptoms.

Grapes and raisins
These snacks are perfect for people, but not so much for pets. Small amounts can make your sidekick sick, while larger amounts can cause kidney failure.

Signs that you should call your vet: non-stop vomiting, exhaustion or depression.

Unbaked bread dough
If it’s made with live yeast, raw dough can expand in your pet's stomach. Small amounts can lead to gastrointestinal upset, bloating and a belly ache.

Signs that you should call your vet: vomiting, diarrhea, loss of coordination, disorientation, stupor and, in severe cases, coma, seizures, swelling belly or the inability to stand up.

Raw eggs, meat and fish
Uncooked food may be contaminated with salmonella or E. coli, which can upset your pet's gastrointestinal tract.

Signs that you should call your vet: vomiting, fever or enlarged lymph nodes.

Fat trimmings and bones
Sure, they’re delicious for pets, but fat trimmings and bones just as dangerous. Fat, whether cooked or raw, can cause pancreatitis, and bone splinters can get lodged in your pet's mouth and throat and even block or perforate the digestive system.

Signs that you should call your vet: diarrhea, blood in the stool, abdominal pain or loss of appetite.

Dairy
Milk and other dairy products are not well tolerated by cats and is particularly rough on dogs. "Dogs don't posses a significant amount of lactase, the enzyme that breaks down milk," Klau said. Dairy products also predispose pets to food allergies.







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